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1. 1. Nashe The Man with Andrew Hadfield (Sussex) and Jennifer Richards (Newcastle)

1. Nashe The Man with Andrew Hadfield (Sussex) and Jennifer Richards (Newcastle)

In this first podcast James Tucker explores ‘Nashe the Man’ with Andrew and Jenny. We learn about where he was he born, what he got up to at Cambridge university, and his later life as a professional writer in London. Nashe has a reputation as a quarrelsome fellow, and he had plenty of enemies, but we focus here on his friendships and collaborations. Which writer do Jenny and Andrew think Nashe would be most like today? Andrew Hadfield and Jennifer Richards co-lead The Thomas Nashe Project. They are editing "Have with you to Saffron Walden" (1596) together for The New Critical Edition of Thomas Nashe. Jennifer is also editing The "Unfortunate Traveller" (1594) and Andrew, "Lenten Stuffe" (1599). For more information on Nashe the Man please do look at Charles Nicholl’s "A Cup of News: The Life of Thomas Nashe", excerpts of which you can find on the Nashe project website.

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2. 4. Prose and print with Kate De Rycker, Jennifer Richards, and John Gallagher

4. Prose and print with Kate De Rycker, Jennifer Richards, and John Gallagher

In this podcast we visit the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp (http://www.museumplantinmoretus.be/en) to find out from Guy Hutsebaut what a sixteenth century printing office would have sounded like. We also learn about the importance of the voice for print-correction. Jenny considers why it is that we tend to think of the printed page as silent, while Kate explains how Nashe used literary techniques to give the impression that he was in conversation with his readers. Printing was a very European business, and James discovers that St Paul’s Churchyard, home to many print shops, was full of ‘strangers’. John explains that Nashe’s London was a thriving multi-national community, and while it needed its European printers, language-learning had an impact on print too. For example, how do you represent the silent letters of French in print? Kate De Rycker is a research associate on the Thomas Nashe Project at Newcastle University, and the editor of 'The Terrors of the Night'(1594) for the collected edition. Her essay ‘Commodifying the author: The mediation of Aretino’s fame in the Harvey-Nashe pamphlet war’ is forthcoming in 'English Literary Renaissance'. Jenny Richards is the PI of The Thomas Nashe Project at Newcastle University, and the editor of 'Have with you to Saffron Walden' (1596) and 'The Unfortunate Traveller' (1594). Her contribution is based on her forthcoming book, 'Voices and Books in the English Renaissance: A New History of Reading', Oxford University Press. John Gallagher is a lecturer in History at the University of Leeds, and his contribution is based on a forthcoming essay in the Huntington Library Quarterly, '‘To heare it by mouth’: Speech & accent in early modern language-learning.’

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3. 3. School And University with Perry Mills, Jenny Richards (Newcastle) and Cathy Shrank (Sheffield)

3. School And University with Perry Mills, Jenny Richards (Newcastle) and Cathy Shrank (Sheffield)

James explores the sound of Nashe’s educational contexts with Perry, Cathy and Jenny. What did boys learn? How were they taught to pronounce Latin, and express a range of emotions? Cathy reminds us just how entertaining some of the exercises could be, and the variety of characters the boys played. Jenny talks about theatrical performance at university. Perry gives us an insider’s view on reading aloud in the classroom today, and its role in the rehearsal of Summers Last Will. And our experts answer the all-important question: were Tudor schoolboys beaten? And God forbid, could learning Latin have actually been fun? Thanks to Neil Treble for inviting us to join his Latin classroom at King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon. Perry Mills is Deputy Head at King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon and the Director of ‘Edward’s Boys’, ‘one of the hottest tickets in town’ (Clare Smout), whose repertoire now includes Nashe’s 'Summers Last Will and Testament.' Their website is: http://www.edwardsboys.org/ Jenny Richards is the PI of The Thomas Nashe Project, and the editor of 'Have with you to Saffron Walden' (1596) and 'The Unfortunate Traveller' (1594). Her contribution is based on her forthcoming book, 'Voices and Books in the English Renaissance: A New History of Reading', Oxford University Press. Cathy Shrank is the editor of 'Pierce Penilesse' (1592) for the edition. Her contributions were based on research she has been doing for a Leverhulme-funded book on dialogue from the late fifteenth to the late seventeenth century.

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4. 2. Sound and Song with Bruce R. Smith, Perry Mills, Chris Marsh, and The Carnival Band.

2. Sound and Song with Bruce R. Smith, Perry Mills, Chris Marsh, and The Carnival Band.

In this podcast James interviews Bruce (University of California), Perry (King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon) and Chris (Queen's University, Belfast) to find out what kind of sounds Nashe heard every day. We follow Nashe from the countryside to the city, courtesy of Perry’s reading of a noisy passage from William Baldwin’s 'Beware the Cat'(1561). Bruce invites us to think about why sound was so important in the Elizabethan world, and to listen to some sounds of London past and present. With the help of The Carnival Band, Chris introduces us to some of the hit songs – ballads – that Nashe listened to, as well as a book Nashe wrote that was turned into a ballad, 'Christs Teares over Jerusalem' (1593). Bruce Smith’s contribution is based on his ground-breaking study, 'The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor' (University of Chicago Press, 1999). Perry Mills is Deputy Head at King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon and the Director of ‘Edwards Boys’, ‘one of the hottest tickets in town’ (Clare Smout), whose repertoire now includes Nashe’s 'Summers Last Will and Testament'. Chris Marsh’s contribution is based on his book 'Music and Society in Early Modern England' (Cambridge University Press, 2010), and his current research as the Principle Investigator of an AHRC-funded project, 'Hit Songs and their Significance in Seventeenth-Century England'. All of the songs heard in this podcast, performed by The Carnival Band, will be available on the ‘Hit Songs’ website in 2018/19.

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5. 5. Performance with Andy Kesson (University of Roehampton) and Tracey Hill (Bath Spa University)

5.  Performance with Andy Kesson (University of Roehampton) and Tracey Hill (Bath Spa University)

James finds out more about Nashe’s world of theatre and spectacle. Andy explores the variety of theatrical spaces in the city and what sounds Nashe would have heard: including the noise of unruly audiences, a variety of sound effects, music and actors’ speech. We learn that Nashe was the first to use the term ‘blank verse’, although he meant it as an insult. Andy also explains the surprising relationship between prose fiction, the mode in which Nashe excelled, and drama. Tracey tells us what was happening outside the playhouses in the theatre of the streets. One event that Nashe would have seen and heard, not least because his friends were involved in it, was the inauguration of the Lord Mayor of London: a loud and spectacular annual celebration involving marching, music, songs, speeches, cannons, and a lot of drinking. What is different about the performance-mad culture of London of the past and the present? Listen to find out! Tracey Hill's contribution is based on her book 'Pageantry and Power: A Cultural History of the Early Modern Lord Mayor's Show' (Manchester University Press, 2010) which was the winner of the 2011 Bevington Prize. Andy Kesson's contribution is based on his current research as the Principle Investigator of the AHRC funded project 'Before Shakespeare' (https://beforeshakespeare.com) and his book 'John Lyly and early modern authorship' (Manchester University press, 2014)

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6. Spring, the sweet spring, Thomas Nashe, John, Danny

Spring, the sweet spring, Thomas Nashe, John, Danny

""Sun, leprous flowers, foul child." Poems, read with improvised music, relating to the problems with the onslaught of April, by John Nashe, John Clare, James Thomson, Millay, D.H. Lawrence, Shakespeare, and Herrick. Recorded by the Parallel Octave Chorus in Baltimore. All sounds from this open session: http://tinyurl.com/ParOct4-7-13

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8. Litany for the Plague

Litany for the Plague

Words adapted from a poem by Thomas Nashe, 'Litany in the Time of Plague'.

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9. A Litany In Time Of Plague ft HamBa

A Litany In Time Of Plague ft HamBa

Once again, I have completed a collaboration with Hamilton Bailie (HamBa). Hamilton’s marvellous vocal intonations on the poem “Litany in time of Plague” provided me with inspiration to add a bed of music to heighten the experience. The poems author, Thomas Nashe, was an important figure in Elizabethan literature, and this poem is a philosophical, if sometimes woeful, look at death. In a time of vast inequality among society, the plague proved a real leveller of class, strength, wealth & beauty. All tiers of society were touched by the hand of death. While I listened to the recitation, I improvised on the piano, latching onto key phrases & words. I then went back & improvised the string parts as well. Later I just polished the whole thing up & what you hear now is the result. In all six verses of this poem, Thomas Nashe repeats the same final two lines: "I am sick, I must die. / Lord, have mercy on us!" Whereas these lines sound gloomy in the first five verses, their meaning changes because of the optimism of the sixth verse. Nashe is suggesting that people's suffering will soon be over, and that death will release them from mortal pain.

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10. Spring (Remake)

Spring (Remake)

This is a remake of the track "Spring" That I did over a year ago. Upon re-listening to it I don't think that recording best represented the song. Original peom by Thoms Nashe "Spring, the sweet Spring" (1567-1601): Spring, the sweet spring, is the year’s pleasant king, Then blooms each thing, then maids dance in a ring, Cold doth not sting, the pretty birds do sing: Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! The palm and may make country houses gay, Lambs frisk and play, the shepherds pipe all day, And we hear aye birds tune this merry lay: Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! The fields breathe sweet, the daisies kiss our feet, Young lovers meet, old wives a-sunning sit, In every street these tunes our ears do greet: Cuckoo, jug-jug, pu-we, to witta-woo! Spring, the sweet spring! Lyrics of the song with amended lyrics by Jamie Kimathi Milburn: The sweet Spring, is the year’s pleasant king; Then maids dance in a ring Lambs frisk and play, the shepherds pipe all day The pretty birds out there do sing Cukko, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! Cukko, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! It’s a songbird It’s a beautiful thing For the people good and true It’s a long word For the sweetest of springs They're the birds that fly Fields breathe sweet, and the daisys kiss our feet As different young lovers meet Lambs frisk and play, the shepherds pipe all day The pretty birds out there do tweet Cukko, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! Cukko, jug-jug, pu-we, to-witta-woo! It’s a songbird It’s a beautiful thing For the people good and true It’s a long word For the sweetest of springs They're the birds that fly in Spring

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11. Brightness Falls from the Air

Brightness Falls from the Air

The title comes from the poem by Thomas Nashe: A Litany In Time Of Plague - from his play Summer's Last Will and Testament. 1592

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12. Gurney, Five Elizabethan Songs, Letitia Stevens And Bonnie Donham Rauzet August 19 2017

Gurney, Five Elizabethan Songs, Letitia Stevens And Bonnie Donham Rauzet August 19 2017

Five Elizabethan Songs (The Elizas) by Ivor Gurney(1890-1937). Recorded in recital at L'Eglise Grandmontaine de Rauzet: August 19th 2017. 1. Orpheus (William Shakespeare) 2. Tears (John Fletcher) 3. Under the Greenwood Tree (Shakespeare) 4. Sleep (John Fletcher) 5. Spring (Thomas Nashe)

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13. TDF EP 157 – Shakespeare was the son of glove makers.

TDF EP 157 – Shakespeare was the son of glove makers.

Mark Anderson is a freelance journalist and wrote a book called Shakespeare by Another Name. He and his friend, Melora Creager are both “Oxfordians.” I know so little about Shakespeare, and I don’t really have a horse in this race, that I’m convinced. Perhaps the other side can be represented another episode! His book is amazing. Enjoy this ep. I really did.    Now hosting the Podcast under it’s awesome umbrella: www.AllThingsComedy.com DONATE folks… I’m working over here. www.dorkforest.com or www.jackiekashian.com NOTES: Thomas Weelkes Earl of Oxford – Edward De Vere Robert Green Ben Jonson – On Poet Ape Is Shakespeare Dead – Mark Twain Walt Whitman on Shakespeare Sigmund Freud on Shakespeare Shakespeare’s guide to Italy Orson Welles on Shakespeare (and the rest) Thomas Nashe Willobie His Avisa Anonymous Earl of Oxford Letters Just a history of Edward de Vere on the internet Rasputina on Weelkes’s Madrigals Min 47 – Nirvana Cellist… Melora Creager ShakesVere on FB Sonnet 72 My Favorite Year – see this movie, Rangers. We could have talked another hour… I had to end it. Sorry. Find them. Credits: Audio leveling by Patrick Brady Music is by Mike Ruekberg Website design by Vilmos: who has his own podcast Apps are available with the bonus contest: iPhone or Android

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14. The Shakespearean Unscene - Shakespeare Lecture by Professor Lorna Hutson

The Shakespearean Unscene - Shakespeare Lecture by Professor Lorna Hutson

Shakespeare Lecture, 12 May 2016. Today, metaphors of enactment dominate discussion of Shakespeare. We talk about ‘staging’ and ‘performing’ abstractions: ‘staging history’, for example, or ‘performing nostalgia’. Critics have thus even made a conundrum of the fact that Hamlet ‘stages’ the process of ‘thought’. This lecture will show, conversely, that in the sixteenth century, the real innovation in English theatre was less performative than rhetorical. Influenced by neoclassicism, English dramatists began to use techniques of rhetorical inquiry to supplement theatre's mis-en-scène. Shakespeare irresistably draws us into imagining offstage ‘scenes' as part of a drama of the psyche: this is the seductive Shakespearean ‘unscene’. Speaker: Professor Lorna Hutson Berry Professor of English Literature, University of St Andrews Chaired by Professor John Kerrigan FBA, University of Cambridge About the speaker: Lorna Hutson is Berry Professor of English Literature at the University of St Andrews and will be Merton Professor of English Literature at Oxford from September 2016. Her books include "Thomas Nashe in Context" (1989), "The Usurer’s Daughter" (1994), "The Invention of Suspicion" (2007), and "Circumstantial Shakespeare" (2015).

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15. Adieu, Farewell Earth's Bliss

Adieu, Farewell Earth's Bliss

The lyrics to this song are "Adieu, Farewell Earth's Bliss" by Thomas Nashe, written in 1590. A benign word, such as "now" or "your" might be slipped in here or there to make the rhythm fit best. Adieu, farewell, earth’s bliss; This world uncertain is; Fond are life’s lustful joys; Death proves them all but toys; None from his darts can fly; I am sick, I must die. Lord, have mercy on us! Rich men, trust not in wealth, Gold cannot buy you health; Physic himself must fade. All things to end are made, The plague full swift goes by; I am sick, I must die. Lord, have mercy on us! Beauty is but a flower Which wrinkles will devour; Brightness falls from the air; Queens have died young and fair; Dust hath closed Helen’s eye. I am sick, I must die. Lord, have mercy on us! Strength stoops unto the grave, Worms feed on Hector’s brave; Swords may not fight with fate, Earth still holds ope her gate. “Come, come!” the bells do cry. I am sick, I must die. Lord, have mercy on us. Wit with his wantonness Tasteth death’s bitterness; Hell’s executioner Hath no ears for to hear What vain art can reply. I am sick, I must die. Lord, have mercy on us. Haste, therefore, each degree, To welcome destiny; Heaven is our heritage, Earth but a player’s stage; Mount we unto the sky. I am sick, I must die. Lord, have mercy on us.

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16. Imogen Holst Unfortunate Traveller

Imogen Holst Unfortunate Traveller

The Unfortunate Traveller was the first substantial word for brass band to be composed by a female composer. Imogen Holst (1907 - 84) submitted the suite as part of her 1930 student portfolio at the Royal College of Music. The title was taken from Thomas Nashe's famous 1594 picaresque novel. Several Morris Dance tunes are introduced, including Bonnie Green Garters, Shepherd’s Hey, The Rose and The Wind Blaws Cauld. The spirited rhythms that remind us how much Imogen Holst loved tradition English dance music. The Suite was first performed on 12 February 1933 at her Majesty's Theatre, Carlisle, by the St. Stephen's Band, with the composer conducting. Interviewed by The Daily Mail, Imogen Holst said: '….it is the first time, so far as I know, that a woman has conducted a brass band at a public concert.... It was their performance at the Crystal Palace Festival [of A Moorside Suite] that inspired me to write this Suite, which I have dedicated to them'. The original brass band version was not heard again after that performance. The composer’s manuscript score, which now resides in the Holst Collection at the Red House, Aldeburgh, is heavily marked with alterations, some of which appear to be in her father’s hand. The scoring reveals the 22- year-old's lack of experience in writing for the band medium. There are problems of balance and range and an absence of colouration of the level that her father achieved so tellingly in A Moorside Suite, which was clearly the model for parts of The Unfortunate Traveller. In order to make the Suite useful for brass bands in the 21st century, I was given permission by the Executor of the Holst Estate, Colin Matthews, to carry out a substantial re-scoring, attempting to give the music more variety of colour, to re-voice and re-balance some textures and to provide additional percussion. The original includes drums in the March only. This performance was given by Grimethorpe Colliery Band (Robert Childs) at the 2015 RNCM Festival of Brass. It is published by PHM Publishing

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