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1. Flying Lotus on The Checkout from WBGO

Flying Lotus on The Checkout from WBGO

Flying Lotus talks to WBGO's Simon Rentner about Kamasi Washington's The Epic, the LA jazz community, his label Brainfeeder, and music from You're Dead! from Warp Records.

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2. Flying Lotus with WBGO's Simon Rentner

Flying Lotus with WBGO's Simon Rentner

Flying Lotus talks to WBGO's Simon Rentner about Kamasi Washington's The Epic, the LA jazz community, his label Brainfeeder, and music from You're Dead! from Warp Records.

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3. Sierra Leone: Celebration, War, And Healing

Sierra Leone: Celebration, War, And Healing

[APWW PGM #552] [Originally aired in 2008] While Sierra Leone is currently in the news for the horrific outbreak of Ebola that has devastated the nation in recent months, the country is no stranger to tragedy. This also means that it has deep reserves of resilience, an ability to come together and overcome great obstacles embedded in its culture. To provide the kind of history that is all too often overlooked when reporting on current events on the African continent, we are encoring this episode of Hip Deep episode, which explores the nation’s past. When Sierra Leone gained independence in 1961, Freetown swayed to the beguiling, breezy lilt of palm wine guitar and danced to the funky pop of Geraldo Pino and the Heartbeats. Once a center of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Sierra Leone became an improbable amalgamation of indigenous peoples and repatriated Africans freed from slavery. Thirty years of political and economic disintegration led to a horrific civil war that claimed tens of thousands of victims and created a generation of maimed bodies and ruined lives between 1991 and 2002. This program profiles the inspiring story of Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars, a band formed in war-era refugee camps in Guinea. This band played a key role in giving citizens the courage to return home, and now, along with other young musicians in Freetown, attempt to pick up where others left off before the war. Produced by Simon Rentner with Wills Glasspiegel.

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4. Born-Free South Africa: A Kaleidoscope of Colors

Born-Free South Africa: A Kaleidoscope of Colors

Born-Free South Africa: A Kaleidoscope of Colors Produced by Sarah Geledi and Simon Rentner Airdate May 26th 2016 Join us on a modern-day musical adventure into Africa's Rainbow Nation. Now, 20-plus years removed from apartheid, South Africa is a nation deep in transition. And, it's reflected in its music—brimming with enthusiasm and creativity, yet also suffering from the growing pains of a new democracy. On the ground at the 2016 Cape Town International Jazz Festival, we celebrate the country's amazing diversity and discover its hottest local talent: Mafikozolo, the sizzling fashionista Zulu pop duo; Tribute “Birdie” Mboweni, a soulful and socially conscious songbird from the rural north; Gigi Lamayne, a fresh voice from hip-hop’s "born-free" generation; Bokani Dyer, a worldly jazz-cat on 88 keys; and Derek Gripper, a Capetonian guitarist virtuoso making us rethink African classical music as a whole.

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5. Reimagining Africa in America from Mainstream Jazz to the Avant Garde: A Chicago Story

Reimagining Africa in America from Mainstream Jazz to the Avant Garde: A Chicago Story

[APWW PGM #616] [Originally aired in 2011] Everyone knows jazz: blues, improvisation, syncopated rhythm, all firmly rooted in Africa via Congo Square in New Orleans. But how have American jazz masters addressed the African ancestry of their music? On this Hip Deep edition, jazz historian Lewis Porter tells the early story of finding the African spirit in Duke Ellington’s “Jungle Nights In Harlem” and exotic Africana in the era of Jim Crow. Author Ingrid Monson sheds light on how innovators like Max Roach and Art Blakey channeled Africa in the civil rights era. Poet Amiri Baraka, founder of the Black Arts Movement, talks about jazz as a weapon for change. Pianist Muhal Richard Abrams gives us the experimental sound of the AACM that, through its transcendental “Great Black Music,” shattered prevailing ideas of jazz and improvisation. Finally, pianist Jason Moran re-imagines Africa in jazz’s present and future with his composition “RAIN." Produced by Simon Rentner. Originally aired 4.28.11

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6. Fees Must Fall: A Voice of Change in South Africa

Fees Must Fall: A Voice of Change in South Africa

We meet 21-year-old Gigi Lamayne of South Africa, a singer/rapper who finds herself at the center of her country’s most important debate and social movement in decades: the #FeesMustFall movement. The day she graduated from university, Gigi dropped a protest song about rising education costs that effectively bar the majority of black South Africans from access to higher education: A new cause for a new time. Produced by Simon Rentner and hosted by Sarah Geledi.

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7. Fees Must Fall: A Voice of Change in South Africa

Fees Must Fall: A Voice of Change in South Africa

We meet 21-year-old Gigi Lamayne of South Africa, a singer/rapper who finds herself at the center of her country’s most important debate and social movement in decades: the #FeesMustFall movement. The day she graduated from university, Gigi dropped a protest song about rising education costs that effectively bar the majority of black South Africans from access to higher education: A new cause for a new time. Produced by Simon Rentner and hosted by Sarah Geledi.

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8. Folge 12: Gut Kick

Folge 12: Gut Kick

Eine Folge über Fußball. Während der Europameisterschaft. Sieht so aus, als würden Simon und Johannes wirklich alles versuchen, um verzweifelt im Mainstream anzukommen. Anders als Marcel Jansen haben sie den Fußball aber schon geliebt, als der sich noch eines kleinen, undergroundigen Millionenpublikums erfreute. Das beweist nicht nur die kultige "Rentner-Elf", die die beiden Holzfüße während der Folge zusammenstellen. In diesem Sinne: Gut Kick und den Kopfhörer ins Ohr.

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9. Reimagining Africa: From Popular Swing to the Jazz Avant-Garde

Reimagining Africa: From Popular Swing to the Jazz Avant-Garde

[APWW #616] [Originally aired 2011] Everyone knows jazz: blues, improvisation, syncopated rhythm, all firmly rooted in Africa via Congo Square in New Orleans. But how have American jazz masters addressed the African ancestry of their music? On this Hip Deep edition, jazz historian Lewis Porter tells the early story of finding the African spirit in Duke Ellington's "Jungle Nights In Harlem" and exotic Africana in the era of Jim Crow. Author Ingrid Monson sheds light on how innovators like Max Roach and Art Blakey channeled Africa in the civil rights era. Poet Amiri Baraka, founder of the Black Arts Movement, talks about jazz as a weapon for change. Pianist Muhal Richard Abrams gives us the experimental sound of the AACM that, through its transcendental "Great Black Music," shattered prevailing ideas of jazz and improvisation. Finally, pianist Jason Moran re-imagines Africa in jazz's present and future with his composition "RAIN." Produced by Simon Rentner.

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10. Music of Black Peru: Cultural Identity In The Black Pacific

Music of Black Peru: Cultural Identity In The Black Pacific

[APWW #558] [Originally aired 2008] The "Black Pacific" is a term coined by our guide, ethnomusicologist Heidi Carolyn Feldman. She describes the circumstance of African descendants displaced not only from their ancestral homes in Africa, but also from the Atlantic coast nations where their enslaved ancestors were originally brought. This Hip Deep edition explores the sonically vibrant realm of Afro-Peruvian music, a young genre identification that has flourished since the 1950s and has now produced artists of international renown, such as singer Susana Baca, and the black folkloric company Peru Negro. The music is sensuous and deeply beautiful, and represents a fascinating and little-understood history. We will hear from Juan Morillo--who represents Peru Negro--from Susana Baca, and from other artists and community scholars Feldman has worked with during her extensive research of this topic. Produced by Simon Rentner and Wills Glasspiegel.

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11. Mbalax Fever: The Story of Popular Music in Senegal

Mbalax Fever: The Story of Popular Music in Senegal

[APWW #591] [Originally aired 2010] Afropop Worldwide travels to Dakar to celebrate the country's 50th anniversary of independence with a Hip Deep history of the nation's signature music style: mbalax. On radio, on television, from boom boxes on the street to the city's legendary nightclubs, this rhythmically explosive dance music is the defining sound of modern Senegal. MIT ethnomusicologist Patricia Tang takes us through the history, from the polyrhythms of Wolof hand-and-stick sabar drumming, through the pan-Africanist passions of Lèopold Senghor, Senegal's first president, to African salsa and the rise of Youssou N'Dour, right up to the present when mbalax still holds its own in the hip hop era. We'll hear how griot musicians Youssou N'Dour and Thione Seck spurred the evolution from salsa to mbalax, and how the new music helped unify the country after decades of French colonial rule. Baaba Maal, Yoro N'diaye, and Orchestra Baobab's Ben Geloune discuss the music's themes, including Islam, polygamy, and poverty. And of course, we hear lots of electrifying mbalax music! Produced by Simon Rentner.

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12. Musica Tropical in Colombia

Musica Tropical in Colombia

[APWW #529] In the 1940s, popular Colombian bandleader Lucho Bermudez introduced black-identified music from the Atlantic Caribbean coast (la Costa) to the light-skinned, wealthy audiences in downtown Bogota. It was the first time that Afro-Colombian music and culture would be recognized by the elite living in the Andean interior. Soon thereafter, music from "La Costa" would become identified as Colombia's national music. This program traces Costeno music -- its harmonious marriage of African, Amerindian, and Spanish roots -- back to the 17th century. Powerful Costeno styles such as gaita, cumbia, and porro -- along with vallenato, an accordion song-based form -- emerged and flourished throughout Colombia and South America in the 20th century. Costeno music would help transform and unify a multicultural nation. Professor Peter Wade, author of the book "Music, Race and Nation: Musica Tropical in Colombia" and musician Martin Vejarano from the band La Cumbiamba Eneye join host Georges Collinet to tell the fascinating story. Produced by Simon Rentner. (originally aired 2007)

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13. The Music of Black Peru: Cultural Identity in the Black Pacific

The Music of Black Peru: Cultural Identity in the Black Pacific

The “Black Pacific” is a term coined by our guide, ethnomusicologist Heidi Carolyn Feldman. She describes the circumstance of African descendants displaced not only from their ancestral homes in Africa, but also from the Atlantic coast nations where their enslaved ancestors were originally brought. This Hip Deep edition explores the sonically vibrant realm of Afro-Peruvian music, a young genre identification that has flourished since the 1950s and has now produced artists of international renown, such as singer Susana Baca, and the black folkloric company Peru Negro. The music is sensuous and deeply beautiful, and represents a fascinating and little-understood history. We will hear from Juan Morillo, who represents Peru Negro, from Susana Baca, and from other artists and community scholars Feldman has worked with during her extensive research of this topic. Produced by Simon Rentner and Wills Glasspiegel. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #558 Distributed 3/9/2017

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14. Sierra Leone: Celebration, War, and Healing

Sierra Leone: Celebration, War, and Healing

[APWW #552] [Originally aired 2008] When Sierra Leone gained independence in 1961, Freetown swayed to the beguiling, breezy lilt of palm wine guitar and danced to the funky pop of Geraldo Pino and the Heartbeats. Once a center of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Sierra Leone became an improbable amalgamation of indigenous peoples and repatriated Africans freed from slavery. Thirty years of political and economic disintegration led to a horrific civil war that claimed tens of thousands of victims and created a generation of maimed bodies and ruined lives between 1991 and 2002. Since the war, the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission has urged the use of music to bring about healing. This program will profile the inspiring story of the Refugee All Stars, a band formed in war-era refugee camps in Guinea. This band played a key role in giving citizens the courage to return home, and now, along with other young musicians in Freetown, attempt to pick up where others left off before the war. Members of the band will speak in this program. And young rappers from Dry Yai will give us insight into the country's emerging hip hop generation. Produced by Simon Rentner with Wills Glasspiegel.

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