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1. Prof. Megalommatis - Yemen’s Historical Vocation in the Red Sea, and the Periplus of the Red Sea

  • Duration: 1261
  • Channel: school
Prof. Megalommatis - Yemen’s Historical Vocation in the Red Sea, and the Periplus of the Red Sea

The Yemenite coast from al Mokha to Aden in the ‘Periplus of the Red Sea’ 1. Mouza (today’s al Mokha) Administration After giving a brief description of Mouza in paragraph 21, the author of the Periplus of the Red Sea gives topographical details about the Himyarite kingdom of which part was Mouza. This is presented in two short paragraphs of the text, 22 and 23. The text reads as follows: "After three days inland trip, we reach Savve, the capital of Mofar Province, which extended all around. There, lives and has his palace the local administrator, Kholaibos. And after another nine days trip in the inland, we reach Safar, the capital of the entire country, where by law reigns Kharibael joining under his scepter the two peoples, the Himyarites and the nearby Sabaeans. He is a friend to the Roman emperors, thanks to the continuously exchanged embassies and presents". 2. Sabaa and Himyar kingdoms merged It is noteworthy that for the author of the Periplus of the Red Sea, who writes around 70 CE, the two kingdoms, Sabaa and Himyar, had merged to form just one state. Even more interesting is that the author refers not to two states but to two peoples, namely the ‘Sabaeites’ and the ‘Homerites’. He testifies to an insightful understanding of the reality that there were several Yemenite peoples, not just one people divided into two (or more) states. In this regard, it is necessary to bear in mind that it was very common for Ancient Greek authors to moderately hellenize foreign names of all sorts (from toponymics to ethnic and personal names) in a way that they allude to a reminiscence of the Greek cultural heritage environment. Consequently, the noun ‘Himyarites’ became ‘Homerites’, alluding to Homer, without however becoming absolutely the same as the adjective ‘homericos’, which derives from the name of the Greek epic poet. First published on 21st March 2008 in AfroArticles, American Chronicle, and Buzzle http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Music accompaniment: 00:00 - Ottoman instrumental tasavvuf music (ney taksimi) "Osmanlı resimleri" 7:40 - Segah peşrevi (Yusuf Paşa notaları) 15:09 - Turkish Ottoman Music Oud Taksim & Şarki in Makam Uşşak


2. Sheba & Himyar: Yemen as World Power on the East–West Trade Routes and marginal Axum (Abyssinia), by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1456
  • Channel: school
Sheba & Himyar: Yemen as World Power on the East–West Trade Routes and marginal Axum (Abyssinia), by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

In his article, Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis basically analyzed an excerpt of the text Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea on Socotra. On this occasion, he expanded on the Yemenite prevalence across what is rather mistakenly called today the "Indian Ocean"; in this regard, Prof. Megalommatis brought forth historical evidence , which clearly demonstrates that the correct term for the Southern Seas is the …. "Yemenite Ocean". At the end of his lengthy article, Prof. Megalommatis makes a comparison between the two maritime colonial empires of Sheba & Himyar (Yemen) and Hadhramaut and the marginal, mountainous Kingdom of Axum (Abyssinia) only to conclude that the latter took part in the trade between East and West after recognizing the Yemenite supremacy in land, desert and sea. To do so, the great Orientalist, Prof. Megalommatis highlights excerpts from the Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea that state clearly that The Other Berberia (the coast between today's Assab in Eritrea and the Horn of Africa) was independent and each coastal city (harbor and port-of-call) there was self-ruled. Sheba & Himyar (Yemen) had colonized Azania (the coast between the Horn of Africa and Daresalaam), whereas Hadhramaut controlled Socotra. Contrarily, Abyssinia was a small territory stretching between Axum and Adulis (today's Massawa in Eritrea). In a series of four videos, we presented an edited and enlarged version of Prof. Megalommatis' article, which was first published here: http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Prof. Megalommatis' article was commented and discussed by Russian specialists as republished here: https://profmegalommatistextsinrussia... First video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4dYm... Second video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhMzb... Third video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZASTe... As music accompaniment we selected what reflects the diversity of the multicultural community of Ancient Socotra - Dioskouridou Island. For the present video: 00:00 Aramaean Christian Hymns from Abuna Qasho Kasho Saliba 1 Saume 1988 Qurobo Alohoyo Slutho (selected part) 8:12 Aramaean Christian Hymns from Abuna Qasho Kasho Saliba 1 Saume 1988 Qurobo Alohoyo Slutho (selected part) 13:28 Traditional dance of Kerala performed by the students of Mudranjaly School of Dance (song in Malayalam, the Dravidian language of SW India) 22:26 Soqotri poetry competition 2011 - Sa'ad bin Suliman bin Hamed Bainogeg recites poetry in Soqotri language Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMSZm...


3. Socotra & Ancient History of Yemen, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1092
  • Channel: travel
Socotra & Ancient History of Yemen, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis analyzed an excerpt of the text Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea on Socotra. In a series of four videos, we will present an edited and enlarged version of Prof. Megalommatis' article, which was first published here: http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Prof. Megalommatis' article was commented and discussed by Russian specialists as republished here: https://profmegalommatistextsinrussia... First video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4dYm... As music accompaniment we selected what reflects the diversity of the multicultural community of Ancient Socotra - Disokouridou Island. For the present video: 00:00 - Bar Mariam Syriac Christian Song Nasrani Malayalam Syriac song The Nasrani Aramaeans settled in Malabar before the Christian era; they are also known as Saint Thomas Christians. Knanaya Aramaean Christians fled Mesopotamia around the middle of the 4th c. CE to avoid persecution at the hands of the Sassanid Empire of Iran. Syriac Aramaic is their religious language, but they are also natives in the local Dravidian language Malayalam. 5:51 - Incense Prayer (in Aramaic) نفحات العطر العذب 9:18 - The Fourth Canticle in Coptic (Tasbeha: Psalms 148, 149 and 150) The 4th Canticle in the Coptic language, chanted during Tasbeha (Sunday Midnight Praises) in Coptic Orthodox Churches. 15:50 - Socotri poem Credit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcrBP... Yemenites, Dravidian Indians, and Egyptian and Greek Alexandrians lived in Socotra as per the information provided by the Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea. Aramaeans, who were omnipresent alongside the trade routes between East and West, settled there and Cosmas Indicopleustes (6th c. CE) mentioned their presence. At the time, Socotrans were Nestorian Christians.


4. Colonial Biases in Support of Barbaric Arabia, and Against Civilized Yemen (Part II), by Prof. Muhammad S. Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1350
  • Channel: school
Colonial Biases in Support of Barbaric Arabia, and Against Civilized Yemen (Part II), by Prof. Muhammad S. Megalommatis

This video features the second part of Prof. Megalommatis' groundbreaking and apocalyptic article "Civilized Yemen vs. Barbaric Arabia". Excerpts: The reconsideration of the US alliances should be undertaken on the basis of the genuine historical and cultural identity of the Great Historical Land that has traditionally been the counter-weight to Arab tribalism and reductionism, and more recently to the Wahhabite / Saudi barbarism and the bogus- Islamic extremism. ......................... The introduction of the term Yemenite Studies is strongly recommended on the basis of the following historical truths. 1. The term matches a modern racial, ethnic, national name. It must be therefore preferred in recognition of the existing historical ties, as it was the case of 'Roman Studies' (instead of 'Latin Studies'). Perhaps, the Catholic Church insisted on the latter, but the modern Italian state always showed a predilection for the former. 2. Yemen itself, as a name, has a great historicity that goes back to pre-Islamic and pre-Christian times with several epigraphic mentions. 3. Although, during the Pre-Islamic times, Yemen was a small tribe – state, certainly eclipsed by Saba (Sheba), Qataban, Himyar and Hadhramaut, its survival and its modern connotation attach to it a great value and make it therefore excellent for diachronic historical use. The all-inclusive character of the name ‘Yemen’ is another reason. 4. Because of the modern radiation of the name, the historical significance of the 'Yemenite' (not ‘South Arabic’!) antiquities will be enhanced in the eyes of the Yemenites, as well as in those of all foreigners, because the terms Himyar, Sheba (Saba), and others do not radiate at a modern national level as greatly as terms like Babylon, Rome, Persia, Egypt, and Greece, to name but a few. 5. The basic historical trends of the ancient Yemenite states, as well as those of the neighboring 'Frankincense Land' (Hadhramaut is denoted by this term in the Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea) will look more familiar to Modern Yemenites and will therefore will be of easier access; this will in turn enable further national emancipation and liberation of the Modern Yemenites from the shackles of colonial traps and schemes. Links to online publications: http://www.fravahr.org/spip.php?artic... http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Music accompaniment: Naseer Shamma (Nasir Chamma, نصير شمة), Maqamat Ziryab From the Euphrates to the Guadalquivir. Lute improvisations, variations and compositions on the modes (maqamat) that Ziryáb brought from Baghdad to Cordoba more than one thousand years ago. 0:00 Salat babiliyya 6:07 Al amiriyya On Naseer Shamma: Naseer Shamma (Nasir Chamma, نصير شمة), né en 1963 à Al-Kût, est un joueur de oud irakien. Continue: https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naseer_... On Maqamat Ziryab: Recorded in Madrid on 17 november 2002 http://www.discogs.com/Naseer-Shamma-... Also: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Maqamat-Zirya...


5. Abyssinia, Ethiopia, Axum, Meroe, Yemen, History and Modern Politics - by Prof. M. S. Megalommatis

  • Duration: 803
  • Channel: school
Abyssinia, Ethiopia, Axum, Meroe, Yemen, History and Modern Politics - by Prof. M. S. Megalommatis

Published on 15 Jun 2016 TO READ THE TEXT GO: https://www.academia.edu/26199165/Aby... Several misconceptions diffused by colonial historians and totalitarian governments need immediate refutation. Ancient Ethiopia and its borders Part of the Abyssinian state propaganda advances the idea that in the Antiquity “the Cushites populated the whole of Eastern Africa” and that “the majority lived in present day Abyssinia”. Even worse, these falsifiers diffuse the idea that at those days “Sudan and Ethiopia were one country” to add that “Abyssinians were just a few Sabaean (Yemenite) refugees who intermingled with the Kushite population”. This is absolutely wrong, although there are some correct elements in it. In addition, it is said in a very misleading way! Even more, it is self-contradictory. The Cushites, as part of the Hamitic family, were living for millennia in the South of Egypt. We now know that the famous non-Egyptian Hyksos dynasties ruled Egypt to some extent thanks to their alliance with the people who developed the Kerma civilization in Sudan during the 2nd millennium BCE. These were the ancestors of the Cushites, who formed later (in the 1st millennium) their capital at Napata, the area of present day Karima. We know that the term Kas was used by the Egyptians to describe the area, the people and the kingdom at the area of modern Sudan, long before the term is disfigured into ‘Mat Kusi’ in Assyrian - Babylonian, ‘Kush’ in Hebrew, and ‘Hus’ in the Greek Biblical text. Then, comes the introduction of the Greek term ‘Aithiopia’ for the same land, people and state. In most of the cases, the Greek Biblical text renders ‘Aithiopia’ what stands in the Hebrew text as Cush. But it is a state, namely the Kushite state of Napata, whose rulers reigned in Egypt for some time (Piankhi, Shabaka, Shabataka, Taharqa and Tanut Amon, the ‘Ethiopian’ dynasty according the term employed by Manetho for the 25th dynasty), before being expelled by the Assyrians emperors Assarhaddon and Assurbanipal, who annexed Egypt. The same term is used in Greek for later phases of Sudan's (Ethiopia’s} pre-Christian history. When twice in the sixth century Psammetichus II (595 BCE) and Cambyses, the Iranian invader of Egypt, (525 BCE), go so far in the south as Napata (Karima lies at 1050 km in the south of Aswan, so 1900 km in the south of Cairo – alongside the Nile) and destroy that city, the Cushites – Ethiopians transfer their capital further in the south, to the area of today’s Bagrawiyah (1550 km in the south of Aswan), as if they wanted to ensure that nobody would undertake an attack against them from the north anymore! Then, rises Meroe (with its numerous pyramids built between 400 BCE and 350 CE and preserved today in Bagrawiyah), about which we have the valuable narrations of Heliodorus (in his ‘Aithiopica’, a description of the Sudanese Meroitic kingdom). Meroe was the capital of Aithiopia. First published in AfroArticles on 21st April 2007


6. Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, Malao to Rhapta (Berbera to Daresalaam), ed. Prof. M. S. Megalommatis

  • Duration: 626
  • Channel: school
Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, Malao to Rhapta (Berbera to Daresalaam), ed. Prof. M. S. Megalommatis

Periplus of the Erythraean Sea, Berbera to Daresalaam The present video offers readers the possibility to read part of the Ancient Greek text of the Periplus of the Red (or Erythrean) Sea, and its Modern Greek translation, as published in the modern Greek edition of the text, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis; the present excerpt covers the Somali East African coastland, namely the space between Malao (Berbera) and Rhapta (Daresalaam). Reading starts at the middle of the first page of the book that is included in this video (paragraph 8), and ends at the end of the first two paragraphs of the last past (paragraph 18). The video features also photographical documentation from the book, as well as pictures from Malao (Berbera), Mundu (Bandar Heis, near Maydh, not far from Erigavo), Mosyllon (Bossasso or Bender Qassim), Nile Ptolemy river, Tapatege, Cape Elephant, Elephant river (all four locations being near modern Alula (in Somali: Ras Caluula), Cape of Spices (Ras Asir or Cape Guardafui), Tabae promontory, Opone (Ras Hafun), Mikra Apokopa and Megala Apokopa (in the area of Bandar Beyla), Mikros Aigialos and Megalos Aigialos (in the area of Hobyo / Obbia), Serapion pasturelands and Nikon pasturelands (in the area between Mogadishu and Kismayo), Pyralaoi islands (around Lamu, in the Somali province of Kenya), and Menuthias island (Pemba island) and Rhapta (Daresalaam). It is the second of a series of videos that will offer modern visualization to a 2000-year old text written by an anonymous Alexandrian Egyptian merchant and captain. Further readings -- analysis in English: Somalia as Part of the East -- West Trade during the Antiquity http://www.afroarticles.com/article-dashboard/Article/Somalia-as-Part-of-the-East---West-Trade-during-the-Antiquity/101255 Somalia, the Other Berberia, Abyssinia, Yemen and the Periplus of the Red Sea http://www.afroarticles.com/article-dashboard/Article/Somalia--the-Other-Berberia--Abyssinia--Yemen-and-the-Periplus-of-the-Red-Sea/101573 Ancient Harbours of Northern Somalia and Colonial Anti-African Historiography http://www.afroarticles.com/article-dashboard/Article/Ancient-Harbours-of-Northern-Somalia-and-Colonial-Anti-African-Historiography/101747 Sailing around the Horn of Africa, before 2000 years http://www.afroarticles.com/article-dashboard/Article/Sailing-around-the-Horn-of-Africa--before-2000-years/102092 Book review: The Periplus of the Red Sea and the Trade between East and West By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis https://www.academia.edu/23401500/The_Periplus_of_the_Red_Erythraean_Sea_O_Periplous_tes_Erythras_Thalasses_-_edition_Muhammad_Shamsaddin_Megalommatis._A_Book_Review


7. National History of the Emirates - Diachronic Trends, Ancient History: by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 184
  • Channel: school
National History of the Emirates - Diachronic Trends, Ancient History: by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

National History of the Emirates - Diachronic Trends This video highlights chapter 5 of the leading article "Meluhha, Gerrha, and the UAE -- The Search for National Identity of a Young Nation" as per below. The chapter deals with the basic characteristics and trends of the area of the Emirates as a land of seminal importance to the Ancient Mesopotamian world for its natural resources and also for its location. https://www.academia.edu/23214313/Meluhha_Gerrha_and_the_Emirates_by_Muhammad_Shamsaddin_Megalommatis By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis The establishment of a nation's historical overview by the indigenous people and not foreign, colonial academia sets the real beginning of the national independence and self-determination. Main Chapters I. National History, National Identity and Colonialism II. Orientalism and Hellenism III. UAE Historical Heritage Threatened by Academic Colonialism IV. Neighboring Nations & Cultures -- Key Components of UAE National History V. National History of the Emirates - Diachronic Trends VI. Assyrian - Babylonian Literature about UAE territory: Meluhha VII. Assyrian -- Babylonian 'Meluhha': UAE territory, not Indus Valley VIII. Assyrian -- Babylonian Texts about Meluhha -- Emirates IX. Meluhha -- Emirates, and the Late Use of 'Meluhha' in Assyrian Imperial Annals X. The Aramaean Foundations of UAE History: the Rise of Gerrha (539 BCE -- 642 CE) XI. Gerrha, Achaemenid Iran, and the Interconnectedness between Africa and Asia XII. Gerrha's Prominence in Antiquity - Harbinger of the Present UAE Rise XIII. Gerrha and Alexander the Great XIV. Why Gerrha Cannot Be Located in Al Ehsa Province of Saudi Arabia XV. Macedonian Naval Expeditions around the Peninsula, and Gerrha XVI. Arsacid Parthian Iran, Seleucid Syria, Ptolemaic Egypt, and Gerrha XVII. Agatharchides on Gerrha and the Sabaean (Sheba) Yemenites XVIII. The Romans in Egypt, the Roman Naval Expedition in Yemen, and Gerrha XIX. Strabo's Textual References to Gerrha XX. Gerrha and the Anonymous Author of the Text 'Periplus of the Red Sea' XXI. Pliny the Elder and Gerrha XXII. Ptolemy the Geographer - his Description of Yemen, Oman, and the Emirates XXIII. Sharjah (Sarkoe) aand Umm Quwain (Kawana) Mentioned by Ptolemy the Geographer XXIV. The Correct Location Gerrha in UAE, and Ptolemy the Geographer XXV. Western UAE, Qatar, Bahrain and Al Ehsa as per Ptolemy the Geographer XXVI. UAE Islands Mentioned by Ptolemy the Geographer XXVII. The Rise of the Sassanid Empire of Iran, and the End of Gerrha


8. Assyrian - Babylonian Literature about UAE territory: Meluhha, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 554
  • Channel: school
Assyrian - Babylonian Literature about UAE territory: Meluhha, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

This video highlights chapter 6 of the leading article "Meluhha, Gerrha, and the UAE -- The Search for National Identity of a Young Nation" as per below. The chapter deals with the identification of the Assyrian -- Babylonian toponymics Tilmun (Bahrain), Magan (Qatar), and Meluhha (Emirates). Incorporating Meluhha and the Assyrian -- Babylonian references to it in their National Emirati History, today's Emiratis can achieve a more accurate and complete perception of their national identity and cultural heritage; that is why the present subject is vital for course of History offered in the Primary and Secondary Education at the UAE whereby the Ancient History of the UAE is gravely underestimated and disregarded. Meluhha, Gerrha, and the UAE -- The Search for National Identity of a Young Nation. https://www.academia.edu/23214313/Meluhha_Gerrha_and_the_Emirates_by_Muhammad_Shamsaddin_Megalommatis By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis Main Chapters I. National History, National Identity and Colonialism II. Orientalism and Hellenism III. UAE Historical Heritage Threatened by Academic Colonialism IV. Neighboring Nations & Cultures -- Key Components of UAE National History V. National History of the Emirates - Diachronic Trends VI. Assyrian - Babylonian Literature about UAE territory: Meluhha VII. Assyrian -- Babylonian 'Meluhha': UAE territory, not Indus Valley VIII. Assyrian -- Babylonian Texts about Meluhha -- Emirates IX. Meluhha -- Emirates, and the Late Use of 'Meluhha' in Assyrian Imperial Annals X. The Aramaean Foundations of UAE History: the Rise of Gerrha (539 BCE -- 642 CE) XI. Gerrha, Achaemenid Iran, and the Interconnectedness between Africa and Asia XII. Gerrha's Prominence in Antiquity - Harbinger of the Present UAE Rise XIII. Gerrha and Alexander the Great XIV. Why Gerrha Cannot Be Located in Al Ehsa Province of Saudi Arabia XV. Macedonian Naval Expeditions around the Peninsula, and Gerrha XVI. Arsacid Parthian Iran, Seleucid Syria, Ptolemaic Egypt, and Gerrha XVII. Agatharchides on Gerrha and the Sabaean (Sheba) Yemenites XVIII. The Romans in Egypt, the Roman Naval Expedition in Yemen, and Gerrha XIX. Strabo's Textual References to Gerrha XX. Gerrha and the Anonymous Author of the Text 'Periplus of the Red Sea' XXI. Pliny the Elder and Gerrha XXII. Ptolemy the Geographer - his Description of Yemen, Oman, and the Emirates XXIII. Sharjah (Sarkoe) aand Umm Quwain (Kawana) Mentioned by Ptolemy the Geographer XXIV. The Correct Location Gerrha in UAE, and Ptolemy the Geographer XXV. Western UAE, Qatar, Bahrain and Al Ehsa as per Ptolemy the Geographer XXVI. UAE Islands Mentioned by Ptolemy the Geographer XXVII. The Rise of the Sassanid Empire of Iran, and the End of Gerrha


9. Socotra, Sheba - Himyar as Maritime Superpower, and the Yemenite Ocean, Part 1 - By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1208
  • Channel: travel
Socotra, Sheba - Himyar as Maritime Superpower, and the Yemenite Ocean, Part 1 - By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

In his article, Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis basically analyzed an excerpt of the text Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea on Socotra. On this occasion, he expanded on the Yemenite prevalence across what is rather mistakenly called today the "Indian Ocean"; in this regard, Prof. Megalommatis brings forth historical evidence , which clearly demonstrates that the correct term for the Southern Seas is the …. "Yemenite Ocean". In a series of four videos, we will present an edited and enlarged version of Prof. Megalommatis' article, which was first published here: http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Prof. Megalommatis' article was commented and discussed by Russian specialists as republished here: https://profmegalommatistextsinrussia... First video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4dYm... Second video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhMzb... As music accompaniment we selected what reflects the diversity of the multicultural community of Ancient Socotra - Disokouridou Island. For the present video: 00:00 Aramean Music - Tokhu tokhu habibe 10:11 Hanuman Chalisa (instrumental part) Artists credited are: Rakesh Chaurasia (Flute), Niladri Kumar (Sitar), Ulhas Bapat (Santoor) & Pt Bhawani Shankar (Pakhawaj) The Hanuman Chalisa hymn was written in the refined Avadhi language. About the Hanuman Chalisa: The Hanuman Chalisa (literally forty chaupais on Hanuman) is a Hindu devotional hymn (stotra) addressed to Hanuman. It is traditionally believed to have been authored by 16th-century poet Tulsidas in the Awadhi language, and is his best known text apart from the Ramcharitmanas. The word "chālīsā" is derived from "chālīs", which means the number forty in Hindi, as the Hanuman Chalisa has 40 verses (excluding the couplets at the beginning and at the end). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanuman... About the Avadhi language: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Awadhi_...


10. Socotra, Sheba - Himyar as Maritime Superpower, and the Yemenite Ocean, Part 2 - By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1044
  • Channel: travel
Socotra, Sheba - Himyar as Maritime Superpower, and the Yemenite Ocean, Part 2 - By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

In his article, Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis basically analyzed an excerpt of the text Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea on Socotra. On this occasion, he expanded on the Yemenite prevalence across what is rather mistakenly called today the "Indian Ocean"; in this regard, Prof. Megalommatis brings forth historical evidence , which clearly demonstrates that the correct term for the Southern Seas is the …. "Yemenite Ocean". In a series of four videos, we will present an edited and enlarged version of Prof. Megalommatis' article, which was first published here: http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Prof. Megalommatis' article was commented and discussed by Russian specialists as republished here: https://profmegalommatistextsinrussia... First video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4dYm... Second video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lhMzb... As music accompaniment we selected what reflects the diversity of the multicultural community of Ancient Socotra - Disokouridou Island. For the present video: 00:00 Aramean Music - Tokhu tokhu habibe 10:11 Hanuman Chalisa (instrumental part) Artists credited are: Rakesh Chaurasia (Flute), Niladri Kumar (Sitar), Ulhas Bapat (Santoor) & Pt Bhawani Shankar (Pakhawaj) The Hanuman Chalisa hymn was written in the refined Avadhi language. About the Hanuman Chalisa: The Hanuman Chalisa (literally forty chaupais on Hanuman) is a Hindu devotional hymn (stotra) addressed to Hanuman. It is traditionally believed to have been authored by 16th-century poet Tulsidas in the Awadhi language, and is his best known text apart from the Ramcharitmanas. The word "chālīsā" is derived from "chālīs", which means the number forty in Hindi, as the Hanuman Chalisa has 40 verses (excluding the couplets at the beginning and at the end). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanuman... About the Avadhi language: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Awadhi_...


11. Socotra - Dioskouridou Island, Exemplary Multicultural Society of Past Times - Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1436
  • Channel: travel
Socotra - Dioskouridou Island, Exemplary Multicultural Society of Past Times - Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis analyzed an excerpt of the text Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea on Socotra. In a series of four videos, we will present an edited and enlarged version of Prof. Megalommatis' article, which was first published here: http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... Prof. Megalommatis' article was commented and discussed by Russian specialists as republished here: https://profmegalommatistextsinrussia... The excerpt of the 'Periplus of the Red Sea’ on Dioscouridou Nesos – Socotra: "And beyond that (cape Syagros, i.e. Ras Fartak), in the open sea, in the middle of the distance between that (cape Syagros) and the opposite cape, the Cape of the Perfumes, but however rather closer to Syagros lies an island that is called Dioskouridou, a very big island with humid climate and desert environment. There are several rivers in the island, crocodiles, many big snakes and huge lizards. The inhabitants eat the flesh of these lizards, and use the fat, after melting it, for oil. There is no agricultural production, neither vineyards, nor wheat fields. The inhabitants are not numerous, and they dwell in the northern side of the island only, that is the part that looks towards the Arabian Peninsula. They are emigrant Yemenites, Indians, and some Greek-speaking Egyptians, and they have all intermingled with one another. They keep themselves busy with trade trips to all the coasts around. The island offers the best type of turtle shells, as well as the usual type of land turtle shell, and white turtle shells, everything in big quantity and in big size. There are also available shells of the huge mountain turtle that are very hard. This turtle’s ribs that are the most useful part of its body cannot be easily cut, and in addition they are of dark yellowish color. Contrarily to that, any part of its shell can be used; out of it, craftsmen make small boxes, small plaques, small dishes and plates, and all sorts of similar objects, since it can be easily cut. One finds here the Indian cinnabar (in Greek: kinnabari) that is collected from specific trees on the trunk of which it flows". As music accompaniment we selected what reflects the diversity of the multicultural community of Ancient Socotra - Disokouridou Island. For the present video: 00:00 - Aramaean Music - Gudo d' Nuhomo (Bethnahrin/Mesopotamia) ܒܝܬ ܢܗܪܝܢ 5:51 - Aramaean Syriac hymn in the eastern (Madenkhaya) dialect 9:49 - The Coptic Hymn of the Intercession of the Saints: Hiten Ni-Epresvia (in Greek: Ο Ύμνος της πρεσβείας των Αγίων) - from the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil Yemenites, Dravidian Indians, and Egyptian and Greek Alexandrians lived in Socotra as per the information provided by the Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea. Aramaeans, who were omnipresent alongside the trade routes between East and West, settled also there and Cosmas Indicopleustes (6th c. CE) mentioned their presence. At the time, Socotrans were Nestorian Christians.


12. Yemen’s Past & Future are in Africa, not a fake 'Arab' world - Part II, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 1372
  • Channel: school
Yemen’s Past & Future are in Africa, not a fake 'Arab' world - Part II, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

Beyond Akroterion Aromaton (Horn of Africa), from Tabai and Opone down to Rhapta, the entire land is called Azania; the appellation encompasses today’s eastern coast of Somalia, as well as the coast of Kenya and Tanzania. Azania is the oldest name used collectively for this entire area (approx. 3000 km long!), and the only collective appellation throughout history. Of course, one may refer to the Ancient Egyptian name ‘Punt’, target-area of the homonymous pharaonic expedition undertaken by Nehesi, the admiral to Pharaoh Hatshepsut. However, Punt served to designate a rather small kingdom in the Horn of Africa region; we cannot conclude accurately about the extent, the size and the power of the 2nd millennium BCE Kingdom of Punt, on the basis of the hieroglyphic text of the Deir al Bahari mortuary temple of Hatshepsut (Thebes – West, Luqsor) and of other earlier and later mentions of this toponymic in Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic texts. However, the name Punt presents definite similarities to the later Ancient Greek toponymic Opone, since –t and –e are respectively Egyptian and Greek endings of feminine names and/or toponymics. What makes a striking impression is the explicit reference of the author of the Periplus of the Erythraean (Red) Sea to the fact that the entire vast area of Azania, according to an ancient law, belonged to the (Yemenite) ruler (‘tyrannos’) of Mofar, and that the earliest state formation that was developed here was due to Yemenites of the Mofar and Muza region. Because of this, the texts states the rights accorded to the merchants of Muza by the Yemenite king (‘basileus’). More than just political control and commercial presence, the text (precisely in paragraph 16) testifies to high level Yemenite colonial practices: "Furthermore, they (Yemenites from Muza and Mofar) send here (Azania, East Africa coast) merchant fleet manned by Yemenite captains and sailors, who thanks to their mixed marriages with indigenous women, as well as to their familiarization with the entire area, know very well the local dialect and the traditions". In addition, the text offers valuable information about the trade exchanged between Yemen and its African colony, Azania. Yemenites were exporting military artifacts and other crafts to the African coast of Azania, and they were also sending wheat and wine as gifts to the local tribal leaders (paragraph 17) in a diplomatic effort to keep their colonial rule stabilized and unchallenged. ............................. From: Yemen’s Past and Perspectives are in Africa, not a fictitious 'Arab' world (2nd Part) By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis First published in Buzzle on 4th August 2005 www.buzzle.com/editorials/8-4-2005-74197.asp Republished: http://phoenicia.org/imgs/YemenAfrica... Leading article by the distinguished Professor Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis which explains the troublesome background that led to the miserable, evil and inhuman situation in which Yemen has been plung


13. Yemen’s History Distorted to Fit Freemasonic Anglo-French Goals - Distortion in HRW Report

  • Duration: 880
  • Channel: school
Yemen’s History Distorted to Fit Freemasonic Anglo-French Goals - Distortion in HRW Report

Yemen’s History Distorted to Fit Freemasonic Anglo-French Goals - HRW Report’s Background By Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis 9 February 2010 http://www.afroarticles.com/article-dashboard/Article/Yemen-s-History-Distorted-to-Fit-Freemasonic-Anglo-French-Goals---HRW-Report-s-Background/199739 In an earlier article published under the title ‘Devastating HRW Report on Yemen Reveals Need for Instant Secession of the South’ (http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/133889), I republished part of the enlightening HRW Report on South Yemen, namely the Contents, the Summary, and the Recommendations. In the present article, I republish further parts, notably the Methodology and the Background, including however again the Contents in order to offer a brief overview to readers. At the end, the notes to the aforementioned parts are made available. Although the Report focuses on violations of Human Rights in occupied South Yemen, a brief historical background is added (that I integrally republish herewith). The background’s largest part is dedicated to the mechanisms of control and oppression, and to Yemenite politics after the forced unification. Yet, two paragraphs are included for the description of Yemenite History’s earlier phases. The over-generalizations, misconceptions, oversights and inaccuracies found therein reveal the epicenter of the problem that lies in the false representation of the historical reality by the Anglo-French academia. Only because of the Orientalist fallacies and their totalitarian imposition throughout the Western academia and universities, the world’s mass media (controlled by those who generate the Orientalist fallacies) manage to be successful in their systematic work of distortion of today’s reality. With the average people misinformed and misled, the Freemasonic regimes of London, Paris and Washington face practically speaking no opposition to their shameful and Anti-Christian deeds. I will first refute in brief the inaccuracies contained in these two paragraphs, and then proceed with the Report’s republication. Continue: as per the link above


14. The Sea Peoples and the Trojan War, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 690
  • Channel: school
The Sea Peoples and the Trojan War, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

The Sea Peoples and the End of the Mycenaean World, by Prof. Megalommatis A Historical Synthesis Speech given at the 2nd International Congress of Mycenaean Studies (Rome, 1991), in French, and published in the Atti e Memorie del Secondo Congresso Internazionale di Micenologia, GEI, Rome, 1996 (under my Christian name Cosmas / Cosimo, which was still in use in 1991, before my adhesion to Islam in 1992) Online available here: https://www.academia.edu/22842873/LES_PEUPLES_DE_LA_MER_ET_LA_FIN_DU_MONDE_MYCENIEN Music: Min-ashur-ila-ishbileya Maqamat Ziryab http://www.naseershamma.com/ http://www.naseershamma.com/Ziryab.html http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/maqa... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naseer_S... http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/p...


15. UAE Education: History. Highlights of Pre-Islamic Antiquity, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 496
  • Channel: school
UAE Education: History. Highlights of Pre-Islamic Antiquity, by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

This video highlights chapter 4 of the following leading article. The chapter deals with the surrounding civilizations that must also become a basic subject of the course of History that is available in the public and private schools at the United Arab Emirates. Interconnection at the present time can be better achieved when a higher level of historical knowledge about the neighboring countries, nations, cultures and civilizations is offered in the Primary and Secondary Education at the UAE. Meluhha, Gerrha, and the UAE -- The Search for National Identity of a Young Nation. https://www.academia.edu/23214313/Meluhha_Gerrha_and_the_Emirates_by_Muhammad_Shamsaddin_Megalommatis The establishment of a nation's historical overview by the indigenous people and not foreign, colonial academia sets the real beginning of the national independence and self-determination. Fully incorporating past moments, cultural identity, and the land's historicity into a system of historical education able to offer a historical perspective of self-perceived identity, based on scientifically approved and historically correct data, a young nation creates the only solid national foundation for future generations. Main Chapters I. National History, National Identity and Colonialism II. Orientalism and Hellenism III. UAE Historical Heritage Threatened by Academic Colonialism IV. Neighboring Nations & Cultures -- Key Components of UAE National History V. National History of the Emirates - Diachronic Trends VI. Assyrian - Babylonian Literature about UAE territory: Meluhha VII. Assyrian -- Babylonian 'Meluhha': UAE territory, not Indus Valley VIII. Assyrian -- Babylonian Texts about Meluhha -- Emirates IX. Meluhha -- Emirates, and the Late Use of 'Meluhha' in Assyrian Imperial Annals X. The Aramaean Foundations of UAE History: the Rise of Gerrha (539 BCE -- 642 CE) XI. Gerrha, Achaemenid Iran, and the Interconnectedness between Africa and Asia XII. Gerrha's Prominence in Antiquity - Harbinger of the Present UAE Rise XIII. Gerrha and Alexander the Great XIV. Why Gerrha Cannot Be Located in Al Ehsa Province of Saudi Arabia XV. Macedonian Naval Expeditions around the Peninsula, and Gerrha XVI. Arsacid Parthian Iran, Seleucid Syria, Ptolemaic Egypt, and Gerrha XVII. Agatharchides on Gerrha and the Sabaean (Sheba) Yemenites XVIII. The Romans in Egypt, the Roman Naval Expedition in Yemen, and Gerrha XIX. Strabo's Textual References to Gerrha XX. Gerrha and the Anonymous Author of the Text 'Periplus of the Red Sea' XXI. Pliny the Elder and Gerrha XXII. Ptolemy the Geographer - his Description of Yemen, Oman, and the Emirates XXIII. Sharjah (Sarkoe) aand Umm Quwain (Kawana) Mentioned by Ptolemy the Geographer XXIV. The Correct Location Gerrha in UAE, and Ptolemy the Geographer XXV. Western UAE, Qatar, Bahrain and Al Ehsa as per Ptolemy the Geographer XXVI. UAE Islands Mentioned by Ptolemy the Geographer XXVII. The Rise of the Sassanid Empire of Iran


16. Seleucid Prophecy about End Times' Greeks and the End of Israel - Skeleton Mosaic in Antioch

  • Duration: 829
  • Channel: news
Seleucid Prophecy about End Times' Greeks and the End of Israel - Skeleton Mosaic in Antioch

We are grateful to the distinguished Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis for having provided us through a long-distance call with insightful and detailed information about the Seleucid Mysticism, Spirituality, and Eschatology. Music accompaniment: Chopin, Marche Funèbre - Sonata No. 2 Op.35 (3/4) / Leopold Stokowski's dramatic orchestration of the "Marche Funèbre" ('Funeral March') from Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2 is played here by Matthias Bamert and the BBC Philharmonic. From a Chandos CD entitled "Stokowski Encores" with all due acknowledgements (CHAN 9349). About the apocalyptic mosaic: http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/be-cheerful-live-your-life-ancient-mosaic-meme-found-in-turkeys-south.aspx?pageID=238&nid=98201&NewsCatID=375 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3553906/Ancient-mosaic-featuring-cheerful-skeleton-Turkey.html#newcomment Important Biblical excerpts: John 12:20-23 Hebrews 10:26-31 Historical background: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antakya https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antioch https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiochus_IV_Epiphanes About the Antiochian Greeks (Romioi / Eastern Romans) today: http://operationantioch.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-roum-nation-rises.html


17. Alexandria, the Eternal Melting Pot - by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

  • Duration: 325
  • Channel: travel
Alexandria, the Eternal Melting Pot - by Prof. Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis

In a 934-word text of impressive erudition, Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis (Μουχάμαντ Σαμσαντίν Μεγαλομμάτης) highlights all the significant -- known and unknown -- aspects of Alexandria's historical uniqueness. A great effort of contextualization and a splendid sample of History of Intellect -- in full rejection of the histoire événementielle of the materialist historians of today's bankrupt world! In the History of Thought or Intellect, which is the Only True One, there are no dates, says Prof. Megalommatis. Beyond its original (hard copy) publication (CLEO monthly, October 2002, Cairo), the article was republished in a great number of portals, notably http://www.afroarticles.com/article-d... http://www.phrasebase.com/archive/all... I thank Prof. Megalommatis also for the pictures of Alexandria, and his suggestions for the music background of this video.