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1. John Keats - Sonnet. On A Picture Of Leander

  • Duration: 57
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet. On A Picture Of Leander

Come hither all sweet Maidens soberly Down looking aye, and with a chasten'd light Hid in the fringes of your eyelids white, And meekly let your fair hands joined be, As if so gentle that ye could not see, Untouch'd, a victim of your beauty bright, Sinking away to his young spirit's night, Sinking bewilder'd 'mid the dreary sea. 'Tis young Leander toiling to his death. Nigh swooning he doth purse his weary lips For Hero's cheek, and smiles against her smile. O horrid dream! see how his body dips Dead-heavy; arms and shoulders gleam awhile; He's gone; up bubbles all his amorous breath! John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-on-a-picture-of-leander/


2. John Keats - Sonnet. Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer's Tale Of 'The Floure And The Lefe'

  • Duration: 54
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet. Written On A Blank Space At The End Of Chaucer's Tale Of 'The Floure And The Lefe'

This pleasant tale is like a little copse: The honied lines do freshly interlace, To keep the reader in so sweet a place, So that he here and there full hearted stops; And oftentimes he feels the dewy drops Come cool and suddenly against his face, And by the wandering melody may trace Which way the tender-legged linnet hops. Oh! What a power hath white simplicity! What mighty power has this gentle story! I, that for ever feel athirst for glory, Could at this moment be content to lie Meekly upon the grass, as those whose sobbings Were heard of none beside the mournful robbins. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-written-on-a-blank-space-at-the-end-of-chaucer-s-tale-of-the-floure-and-the-lefe/


3. John Keats - Two Sonnets. To Haydon, With A Sonnet Written On Seeing The Elgin Marbles

  • Duration: 104
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Two Sonnets. To Haydon, With A Sonnet Written On Seeing The Elgin Marbles

I. Haydon! forgive me that I cannot speak Definitively of these mighty things; Forgive me, that I have not eagle's wings, That what I want I know not where to seek, And think that I would not be over-meek, In rolling out upfollowed thunderings, Even to the steep of Heliconian springs, Were I of ample strength for such a freak. Think, too, that all these numbers should be thine; Whose else? In this who touch thy vesture's hem? For, when men stared at what was most divine With brainless idiotism and o'erwise phlegm, Thou hadst beheld the full Hesperian shine Of their star in the east, and gone to worship them. II. On Seeing The Elgin Marbles. My spirit is too weak - mortality Weighs heavily upon me like unwilling sleep, And each imagined pinnacle and steep Of godlike hardship tells me I must die Like a sick eagle looking at the sky. Yet 'tis a gentle luxury to weep That I have not the cloudy winds to keep, Fresh for the opening of the morning's eye. Such dim-conceived glories of the brain Bring round the heart an undescribable feud; So do these wonders a most dizzy pain, That mingles Grecian grandeur with the rude Wasting of old Time -- with a billowy main -- A sun -- a shadow of a magnitude. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/two-sonnets-to-haydon-with-a-sonnet-written-on-seeing-the-elgin-marbles/


4. John Keats - Sonnet: Oh! How I Love, On A Fair Summer's Eve

  • Duration: 57
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet: Oh! How I Love, On A Fair Summer's Eve

Oh! how I love, on a fair summer's eve, When streams of light pour down the golden west, And on the balmy zephyrs tranquil rest The silver clouds, far -- far away to leave All meaner thoughts, and take a sweet reprieve From little cares; to find, with easy quest, A fragrant wild, with Nature's beauty drest, And there into delight my soul deceive. There warm my breast with patriotic lore, Musing on Milton's fate -- on Sydney's bier -- Till their stern forms before my mind arise: Perhaps on wing of Poesy upsoar, Full often dropping a delicious tear, When some melodious sorrow spells mine eyes. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-oh-how-i-love-on-a-fair-summer-s-eve/


5. John Keats - Sonnet. Written On A Blank Page In Shakespeare's Poems, Facing 'A Lover's Complaint'

  • Duration: 57
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet. Written On A Blank Page In Shakespeare's Poems, Facing 'A Lover's Complaint'

Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art -- Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priest-like task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask Of snow upon the mountains and the moors -- No -- yet still stedfast, still unchangeable, Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast, To feel for ever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever -- or else swoon to death. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-written-on-a-blank-page-in-shakespeare-s-poems-facing-a-lover-s-complaint/


6. John Keats - Sonnet. On Leigh Hunt's Poem 'The Story of Rimini'

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet. On Leigh Hunt's Poem 'The Story of Rimini'

Who loves to peer up at the morning sun, With half-shut eyes and comfortable cheek, Let him with this sweet tale full often seek For meadows where the little rivers run; Who loves to linger with that brightest one Of Heaven -- Hesperus -- let him lowly speak These numbers to the night and starlight meek, Or moon, if that her hunting be begun. He who knows these delights, and, too, is prone To moralize upon a smile or tear, Will find at once a region of his own, A bower for his spirit, and will steer To alleys where the fir-tree drops its cone, Where robins hop, and fallen leaves are sear. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-on-leigh-hunt-s-poem-the-story-of-rimini/


7. John Keats - Translated From A Sonnet Of Ronsard

  • Duration: 49
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Translated From A Sonnet Of Ronsard

Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies For more adornment a full thousand years; She took their cream of Beauty's fairest dyes, And shap'd and tinted her above all Peers: Meanwhile Love kept her dearly with his wings, And underneath their shadow fill'd her eyes With such a richness that the cloudy Kings Of high Olympus utter'd slavish sighs. When from the Heavens I saw her first descend My heart took fire, and only burning pains They were my pleasures -- they my Life's sad end; Love pour'd her beauty into my warm veins... John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/translated-from-a-sonnet-of-ronsard/


8. John Keats - Sonnet. A Dream, After Reading Dante's Episode Of Paulo And Francesca

  • Duration: 60
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet. A Dream, After Reading Dante's Episode Of Paulo And Francesca

As Hermes once took to his feathers light, When lulled Argus, baffled, swooned and slept, So on a Delphic reed, my idle spright So played, so charmed, so conquered, so bereft The dragon-world of all its hundred eyes; And seeing it asleep, so fled away-- Not to pure Ida with its snow-cold skies, Nor unto Tempe, where Jove grieved a day; But to that second circle of sad Hell, Where in the gust, the whirlwind, and the flaw Of rain and hail-stones, lovers need not tell Their sorrows. Pale were the sweet lips I saw, Pale were the lips I kissed, and fair the form I floated with, about that melancholy storm. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-a-dream-after-reading-dante-s-episode-of-paulo-and-francesca/


9. John Keats - His Last Sonnet

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: music
John Keats - His Last Sonnet

Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art! - Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night, And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like Nature's patient sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Or gazing on the new soft fallen mask Of snow upon the mountains and the moors - No -yet still steadfast, still unchangeable, Pillowed upon my fair love's ripening breast, To feel for ever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever -or else swoon to death. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/his-last-sonnet/


10. John Keats - Sonnet To The Nile

  • Duration: 58
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet To The Nile

Son of the old Moon-mountains African! Chief of the Pyramid and Crocodile! We call thee fruitful, and that very while A desert fills our seeing's inward span: Nurse of swart nations since the world began, Art thou so fruitful? or dost thou beguile Such men to honour thee, who, worn with toil, Rest for a space 'twixt Cairo and Decan? O may dark fancies err! They surely do; 'Tis ignorance that makes a barren waste Of all beyond itself. Thou dost bedew Green rushes like our rivers, and dost taste The pleasant sunrise. Green isles hast thou too, And to the sea as happily dost haste. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-to-the-nile/


11. John Keats - Sonnet VI. To G. A. W.

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet VI. To G. A. W.

Nymph of the downward smile and sidelong glance! In what diviner moments of the day Art thou most lovely? -- when gone far astray Into the labyrinths of sweet utterance, Or when serenely wandering in a trance Of sober thought? -- Or when starting away, With careless robe to meet the morning ray, Thou sparest the flowers in thy mazy dance? Haply 'tis when thy ruby lips part sweetly, And so remain, because thou listenest: But thou to please wert nurtured so completely That I can never tell what mood is best; I shall as soon pronounce which Grace more neatly Trips it before Apollo than the rest. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-vi-to-g-a-w/


12. John Keats - Sonnet. Written Upon The Top Of Ben Nevis

  • Duration: 57
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet. Written Upon The Top Of Ben Nevis

Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud Upon the top of Nevis, blind in mist! I look into the chasms, and a shroud Vapourous doth hide them, -- just so much I wist Mankind do know of hell; I look o'erhead, And there is sullen mist, -- even so much Mankind can tell of heaven; mist is spread Before the earth, beneath me, -- even such, Even so vague is man's sight of himself! Here are the craggy stones beneath my feet,-- Thus much I know that, a poor witless elf, I tread on them, -- that all my eye doth meet Is mist and crag, not only on this height, But in the world of thought and mental might! John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-written-upon-the-top-of-ben-nevis/


13. John Keats - Two Sonnets On Fame

  • Duration: 110
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Two Sonnets On Fame

I. Fame, like a wayward girl, will still be coy To those who woo her with too slavish knees, But makes surrender to some thoughtless boy, And dotes the more upon a heart at ease; She is a Gypsy,-will not speak to those Who have not learnt to be content without her; A Jilt, whose ear was never whisper'd close, Who thinks they scandal her who talk about her; A very Gypsy is she, Nilus-born, Sister-in-law to jealous Potiphar; Ye love-sick Bards! repay her scorn for scorn; Ye Artists lovelorn! madmen that ye are! Make your best bow to her and bid adieu, Then, if she likes it, she will follow you. II. 'You cannot eat your cake and have it too.'~Proverb. How fever'd is the man, who cannot look Upon his mortal days with temperate blood, Who vexes all the leaves of his life's book, And robs his fair name of its maidenhood; It is as if the rose should pluck herself, On the ripe plum finger its misty bloom, As if a Naiad, like a meddling elf, Should darken her pure grot with muddy gloom: But the rose leaves herself upon the briar, For winds to kiss and grateful bees to feed, And the ripe plum still wears its dim attire, The undisturbed lake has crystal space; Why then should man, teasing the world for grace, Spoil his salvation for a fierce miscreed? John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/two-sonnets-on-fame/


14. John Keats - Sonnet: Before He Went

  • Duration: 54
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet: Before He Went

BEFORE he went to feed with owls and bats Nebuchadnezzar had an ugly dream, Worse than an Hus'if's when she thinks her cream Made a Naumachia for mice and rats. So scared, he sent for that 'Good King of Cats' Young Daniel, who soon did pluck away the beam From out his eye, and said he did not deem The sceptre worth a straw his Cushions old door-mats. A horrid nightmare similar somewhat Of late has haunted a most motley crew, Most loggerheads and Chapmen we are told That any Daniel tho' he be a sot Can make the lying lips turn pale of hue By belching out 'ye are that head of Gold.' John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-before-he-went/


15. John Keats - Sonnet To John Hamilton Reynolds

  • Duration: 54
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet To John Hamilton Reynolds

O that a week could be an age, and we Felt parting and warm meeting every week, Then one poor year a thousand years would be, The flush of welcome ever on the cheek: So could we live long life in little space, So time itself would be annihilate, So a day's journey in oblivious haze To serve ourjoys would lengthen and dilate. O to arrive each Monday morn from Ind! To land each Tuesday from the rich Levant! In little time a host of joys to bind, And keep our souls in one eternal pant! This morn, my friend, and yester-evening taught Me how to harbour such a happy thought. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-to-john-hamilton-reynolds/


16. John Keats - Sonnet To George Keats: Written In Sickness

  • Duration: 60
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet To George Keats: Written In Sickness

Brother belov'd if health shall smile again, Upon this wasted form and fever'd cheek: If e'er returning vigour bid these weak And languid limbs their gladsome strength regain, Well may thy brow the placid glow retain Of sweet content and thy pleas'd eye may speak The conscious self applause, but should I seek To utter what this heart can feel, Ah! vain Were the attempt! Yet kindest friends while o'er My couch ye bend, and watch with tenderness The being whom your cares could e'en restore, From the cold grasp of Death, say can you guess The feelings which these lips can ne'er express; Feelings, deep fix'd in grateful memory's store. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-to-george-keats-written-in-sickness/


17. John Keats - Sonnet XV. On The Grasshopper And Cricket

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet XV. On The Grasshopper And Cricket

The poetry of earth is never dead: When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead; That is the Grasshopper's -- he takes the lead In summer luxury, -- he has never done With his delights; for when tired out with fun He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed. The poetry of earth is ceasing never: On a lone winter evening, when the frost Has wrought a silence, from the stove there shrills The Cricket's song, in warmth increasing ever, And seems to one in drowsiness half lost, The Grasshopper's among some grassy hills. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-xv-on-the-grasshopper-and-cricket-2/


18. John Keats - Sonnet To Chatterton

  • Duration: 60
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet To Chatterton

O Chatterton! how very sad thy fate! Dear child of sorrow -- son of misery! How soon the film of death obscur'd that eye, Whence Genius mildly falsh'd, and high debate. How soon that voice, majestic and elate, Melted in dying numbers! Oh! how nigh Was night to thy fair morning. Thou didst die A half-blown flow'ret which cold blasts amate. But this is past: thou art among the stars Of highest heaven: to the rolling spheres Thou sweetly singest: nought thy hymning mars, Above the ingrate world and human fears. On earth the good man base detraction bars From thy fair name, and waters it with tears. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-to-chatterton/


19. John Keats - Sonnet To Sleep

  • Duration: 58
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet To Sleep

O soft embalmer of the still midnight! Shutting, with careful fingers and benign, Our gloom-pleas'd eyes, embower'd from the light, Enshaded in forgetfulness divine; O soothest Sleep! if so it please thee, close, In midst of this thine hymn, my willing eyes. Or wait the Amen, ere thy poppy throws Around my bed its lulling charities; Then save me, or the passed day will shine Upon my pillow, breeding many woes; Save me from curious conscience, that still hoards Its strength for darkness, burrowing like a mole; Turn the key deftly in the oiled wards, And seal the hushed casket of my soul. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-to-sleep/


20. John Keats - Sonnet XIII. Addressed To Haydon

  • Duration: 54
  • Channel: music
John Keats - Sonnet XIII. Addressed To Haydon

High-mindedness, a jealousy for good, A loving-kindness for the great man's fame, Dwells here and there with people of no name, In noisome alley, and in pathless wood: And where we think the truth least understood, Oft may be found a 'singleness of aim,' That ought to frighten into hooded shame A money-mongering, pitiable brood. How glorious this affection for the cause Of steadfast genius, toiling gallantly! What when a stout unbending champion awes Envy and malice to their native sty? Unnumbered souls breathe out a still applause, Proud to behold him in his country's eye. John Keats http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/sonnet-xiii-addressed-to-haydon-2/