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1. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - William Wallace

  • Duration: 55
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - William Wallace

(For the Ballarat statue of him) THIS is Scotch William Wallace. It was He Who in dark hours first raised his face to see: Who watched the English tyrant Nobles spurn, Steel-clad, with iron hoofs the Scottish Free: Who armed and drilled the simple footman Kern, Yea, bade in blood and rout the proud Knight learn His Feudalism was dead, and Scotland stand Dauntless to wait the day of Bannockburn! O Wallace, peerless lover of thy land, We need thee still, thy moulding brain and hand! For us, thy poor, again proud tyrants spurn, The robber Rich, a yet more hateful band! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/william-wallace-3/


2. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To The Emperor William I

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To The Emperor William I

YOU are at least a Man, of men a King. You have a heart, and with that heart you love. The race you come from is not gendered of The filthy sty whose latest litter cling Round England's flesh-pots, gorged hogs gluttoning. No, but on flaming battlefields, in courts Of honour and of danger old resorts, The name of Hohen-Zollern clear doth ring. O Father William, you, not falsely weak, Who never spared the rod to spoil the child, Our mighty Germany, we only speak, To bless you with a blessing sweet and mild, Ere that near heaven your weary footsteps seek Where love with liberty is reconciled. Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-the-emperor-william-i/


3. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Algernon Charles Swinburne

  • Duration: 104
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Algernon Charles Swinburne

SHRIEKS out of smoke, a flame of dung-straw fire That is not quenched but hath for only fruit What writhes and dies not in its rotten root: Two things made flesh, the visible desire To match in filth the skunk, the ape in ire, Mouthing before the mirrors with wild foot Beyond all feebler footprint of pursuit, The perfect twanger of the Chinese lyre! A heart with generous virtues run to seed In vices making all a jumbled creed: A soul that knows not love nor trust nor shame, But cuts itself with knives to bawl and bleed — If thou we've known of late, art still the same, What need, O soul, to sign thee with thy name? Once on thy lips the golden-honeyed bees Settling made sweet the heart that was not strong, And sky and earth and sea swooned into song: Once on thine eyes the light of agonies Flashed through the soul and robbed the days of ease. But tunes turn stale when love turns babe, and long The exiled gentlemen grow fat with wrong, And peasants, workmen, beggars, what are these? O you who sang the Italian smoke above — Mud-lark of Freedom, pipe of that vile band Whose envy slays the tyrant, not the love Of these poor souls none have the keeping of — It is your hand — it is your pander hand Smites the bruised mouth of pilloried Ireland! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/algernon-charles-swinburne/


4. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To An Artist

  • Duration: 134
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To An Artist

YOU tell me these great lords have raised up Art? I say they have degraded it. Look you, When ever did they let the Poet sing, The Painter paint, the Sculptor hew and cast, The Music raise her heavenly voice, except To praise them and their wretched rule o'er men? Behold our English poets that were poor Since these great lords were rich and held the state: Behold the glories of the German land, Poets, Musicians, driven, like them, to death Unless they'd tune their spirits' harps to play Drawing-room pieces for the chattering fools Who aped the taste for Art or for a leer. I say, no Art was ever noble yet, Noble and high, the speech of godlike men, When fetters bound it, be they gold or flowers. All that is noblest, highest, greatest, best, Comes from the Galilean peasant's hut, comes from The Stratford village, the Ayrshire plough, the shop That gave us Chaucer, the humble Milton's trade — Bach's, Mozart's, great Beethoven's — and these are they Who knew the People, being what they knew! Wherefore, if in the future years no strain, No picture of earth's glory like to what Your Artists raised for that small clique or this Of supercilious imbecilities — O if no better demi-gods of Art Can rise save those whose barbarous tinsel yet Makes hideous all the beauty of old homes — Then let us seek the comforts of despair In democratic efforts dead and gone; Weep with Pheideian Athens, sigh an hour With Raffaelle's Florence, beat the head and breast O'er Shakspere's England that from Milton's took In lips the name that leaped from lead and flame From out her heart against the Spanish guns! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-an-artist/


5. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To An Old Friend In England

  • Duration: 67
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To An Old Friend In England

WAS it for nothing in the years gone by, O my love, O my friend, You thrilled me with your noble words of faith? — Hope beyond life, and love, love beyond death! Yet now I shudder, and yet you did not die, O my friend, O my love! Was it for nothing in the dear dead years, O my love, O my friend, I kissed you when you wrung my heart from me, And gave my stubborn hand where trust might be? Yet then I smiled, and see, these bitter tears, O my friend, O my love! No bitter words to say to you have I, O my love, O my friend! That faith, that hope, that love was mine, not yours! And yet that kiss, that clasp endures, endures. I have no bitter words to say. Good-bye, O my friend, O my love! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-an-old-friend-in-england/


6. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To The Girls Of The Unions

  • Duration: 59
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To The Girls Of The Unions

GIRLS, we love you, and love Asks you to give again That which draws it above, Beautiful, without stain. Give us weariless faith In our Cause pure, passionate, Dearer than life and death, Dear as the love that's it! Give to the man who turns Traitrous hands or forlorn Back from the plough that burns, Give him pitiless scorn! Let him know that no wife Would bear him a fearless child To hate and loathe the life Of a leprous father defiled. Girls, we love you, and love Asks you to give again That which draws it above, Beautiful, without stain! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-the-girls-of-the-unions/


7. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Père-la-Chaise

  • Duration: 66
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Père-la-Chaise

(PARIS) I STOOD in Père-la-Chaise. The putrid City, Paris, the harlot of the nations, lay, The bug-bright thing that knows not love nor pity, Flashing her bare shame to the summer's day. Here where I stand, they slew you, brothers, whom Hell's wrongs unutterable had made as mad. The rifle shots re-echoed in his tomb, The gilded scoundrel's who had been so glad. O Morny, O blood-sucker of thy race — O brain, O hand that wrought out empire that The lust in one for power, for tinsel place, Might rest; one lecher's hungry heart grow fat — Is it for nothing, now and evermore, O you whose sin in life had death in ease, The murder of your victims beats the door Wherein your careless carrion lies at peace? Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/p-re-la-chaise/


8. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Anarchism

  • Duration: 48
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Anarchism

'TIS not when I am here, In these homeless homes, Where sin and shame and disease And foul death comes; 'Tis not when heart and brain Would be still and forget Men and women and children Dragged down to the pit: But when I hear them declaiming Of 'liberty,' 'order,' and 'law,' The husk-hearted Gentleman And the mud-hearted Bourgeois, That a sombre hateful desire Burns up slow in my breast To wreck the great guilty Temple, And give us rest! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/anarchism/


9. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Lord Leitrim

  • Duration: 36
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Lord Leitrim

BRUTE beast, at last you have it! Now we know Truth's not a phrase, justice an idle show. Your life ran red with murder, green with lust. Blood has washed blood clean, and in the final dust Your carrion will be purified. Yet, see, Though your body perish, for your soul shall be An immortality of infamy! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/lord-leitrim/


10. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - In The Edgware Road

  • Duration: 99
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - In The Edgware Road

(TO LORD——) WILL you not buy? She asks you, my lord, you Who know the points desirable in such. She does not say that she is perfect. True, She's not too pleasant to the sight or touch. But then — neither are you! Her cheeks are rather fallen in; a mist Glazes her eyes, for all their hungry glare. Her lips do not breathe balmy when they're kissed. And yet she's not more loathsome than, I swear, Your grandmother at whist. My lord, she will admit, and need not frame Excuses for herself, that she's not chaste. First a young lover had her; then she came From one man's to another's arms, with haste. Your mother did the same. Moreover, since she's married, once or twice She's sold herself for certain things at night. To sell one's body for the highest price Of social ease and power, all girls think right. Your sister did it thrice. What, you'll not buy? You'll curse at her instead? — Her children are alone, at home, quite near. These winter streets, so gay at nights, 'tis said, Have 'ticed the wanton out. She could not hear Her children cry for bread! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/in-the-edgware-road/


11. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Parallels For The Pious

  • Duration: 51
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Parallels For The Pious

'HE holds a pistol to my head, Swearing he will shoot me dead, If he have not my purse instead, The robber!' 'He, with the lash of wealth and power, Flogs out my heart and flings the dower, The sneering pittance of his hour, The robber!' 'He shakes his serpent tongue that lies, Wins trust for poisoned sophistries, And stabs me in the dark, and flies, The assassin!' 'He pits me in the dreadful fight Against my fellow. Then he quite Strips both his victims in the night, The assassin!' Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/parallels-for-the-pious/


12. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Dedication To His Love

  • Duration: 125
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Dedication To His Love

SWEETEST, in desperate hours Of clouds and lightning and rain, You came like a vision of flowers And summer and song once again: You came, and I could not receive you, Seared in my flesh, in my sight. I heedlessly turned back to leave you; We passed on into the night. (Heart, soul and all, sweet, never to sever, Love me for ever!) Dearest, in hours of twilight, Terrible, silent and lone, When the light, long sought for as my light And found, for ever seemed gone — When the hope of the love-dream of boyhood Passed sad with unknowing rebuff, With your passionate patience and joyhood You came, O my Priestess of Love! (Heart, soul and all, dear, never to sever, Love me for ever!) With your lips to mine deathly-reposing, You kissed back the blood and the sighs: You lit up my tired eyes unclosing With the light of your beautiful eyes. You held me close-pressed to your bosom, Your heart to my heart, beating strong, In mine eyes put your life like a blossom, Put my love in your lips like a song! (Heart, soul and all, sweet, never to sever, Love me for ever!) Dearest, of my heart-blood's Evangel I hail you Queen, and of me: Sweetest, I revere you Archangel Of the better time that shall be. So to these Songs, for my love's sake, As Priestess of Love must you stand, And, for the great Truth above's sake, God's seraph with his sword in your hand! (Heart, soul and all, dear, never to sever, Love me for ever!) Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/dedication-to-his-love/


13. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - The Fisherman

  • Duration: 41
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - The Fisherman

(Mindanao, Philippines) IN the dark waveless sea, Deep blue under deep blue, The fisher drifts by on the tide In his small pole-balanced canoe. Above him the cloud-capped hills Crown the dense jungly sweeps; The cocoa-nut groves hedge round The hut where the beach-wave sleeps. Is it not better so To be as this Savage is, Than to live the Wage-slave's life Of hopeless agonies? Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-fisherman-10/


14. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To Sydney Jephcott

  • Duration: 40
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To Sydney Jephcott

(The friend my verse won for me) With a Copy of My 'Poetical Works' 'TAKE with all my heart, friend, this, The labour of my past, Though the heart here hidden is And the soul's eternities Hold the present fast. 'Take it, still, with soul and heart, Pledge of that dear day When the shadows stir and start, By the bright Sun burst apart — Young Australia!' Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-sydney-jephcott/


15. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - In Trafalgar Square

  • Duration: 65
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - In Trafalgar Square

THE stars shone faint through the smoky blue; The church-bells were ringing; Three girls, arms laced, were passing through, Tramping and singing. Their heads were bare: their short skirts swung As they went along; Their scarf-covered breasts heaved up, as they sung Their defiant Song. It was not too clean, their feminine lay, But it thrilled me quite With its challenge to taskmaster villainous day And infamous night, With its threat to the robber Rich, the Proud, The respectable Free. And I laughed and shouted to them aloud, And they shouted to me! 'Girls, that's the shout, the shout we shall utter When, with rifles and spades, We stand, with the old Red Flag aflutter, On the barricades!' Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/in-trafalgar-square/


16. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Axiom

  • Duration: 28
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Axiom

LET him who toils, enjoy Fruit of his toiling. Let him whom sweats annoy, No more be spoiling. For we would have it be That, weak or stronger, Not he who works, but he Who works not, hunger! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/axiom-2/


17. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Liberty!

  • Duration: 112
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - Liberty!

'LIBERTY?' Is that the cry, then? We have heard it oft of yore. Once it had, we think, a meaning; Let us hear it now no more. We have read what history tells us Of its heroes, martyrs too. Doubtless they were very splendid, But they're not for me and you. There were Greeks who fought and perished, Won from Persians deathless graves. Had we lived then, we're aware that We'd have been those same Greeks' slaves! Then a Roman came who loved us; Caesar gave men tongues and swords. Crying 'Liberty,' they fought him, Cato and his wild-beast lords. When he'd give a broader franchise, Lift the mangled nations bowed, Crying 'Liberty!' they killed him, Brutus and his cut-throat crowd. We have read what history tells us, O the truthful memory clings! Tacitus, the chartered liar, Gloating over poisoned kings! 'Liberty!' The stale cry echoes Past smug homesteads, tinsel thrones, Over smoking fields and hovels, Murdered peasants' bleaching bones. That's the cry that mocked us madly, Toiling in our living graves, When hell-mines sent up the chorus; 'Britons never shall be slaves!' 'Liberty!' We care not for it! What we care for's food, clothes, homes, For our dear ones, toiling, waiting For the time that never comes! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/liberty-23/


18. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To His Love

  • Duration: 47
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - To His Love

(With his first book of 'Songs') 'MY Sweet, my Child, through all this night Of dark and wind and rain, Where thunder crashes, and the light Sears the bewildered brain, 'It is your Face, your lips, your eyes I see rise up; I hear Your Voice that sobs and calls and cries, Or shrills and mocks at fear. 'O this that's mine is yours as well, For side by side our feet Trod through these bitter brakes of hell. Take it, my Child, my Sweet!' Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/to-his-love/


19. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - The Australian Flag

  • Duration: 48
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - The Australian Flag

PURE blue Flag of heaven With your silver stars, Not beside those Crosses' Blood-stained torture-bars: Not beside the token The foul sea-harlot gave, Pure blue Flag of heaven, Must you ever wave! No, but young exultant, Free from care and crime, The soulless selfish England Of this later time: No, but, faithful, noble Rising from her grave, Flag of light and liberty, For ever must you wave! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-australian-flag/


20. Francis William Lauderdale Adams - The Outcasts

  • Duration: 32
  • Channel: music
Francis William Lauderdale Adams - The Outcasts

(Melbourne) HERE to the parks they come, The scourings of the town, Like weary wounded animals Seeking where to lie them down. Brothers, let us take together An easeful period. There is worse than to be as We are — Cast out, not of Men but of God! Francis William Lauderdale Adams http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-outcasts-2/