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22. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Colorado, United States

  • Duration: 51
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Colorado, United States

Thanks for watching.... Dotsero https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dotsero La Garita Caldera https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Garita_Caldera Mount Sopris https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Sopris Never Summer Mountains https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Never_Summer_Mountains Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_the_United_States Music: Cromag Beat,Silent Partner; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical examples of this kind of volcano are Mount Etna and the volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


23. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Hawaii, United States

  • Duration: 122
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Hawaii, United States

Thanks for watching... Diamond Head https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diamond_Head,_Hawaii Haleakala or East Maui Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haleakala Hanauma Bay https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanauma_Bay Hualalai https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hualalai Ka'ena Point https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaena_Point Kahoolawe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahoolawe Kawaikini https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kawaikini Kilauea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilauea Kohala (mountain) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kohala Koko Guyot https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koko_Guyot Koko Head Crater https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koko_Head Ko?olau Range https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ko?olau_Range Lanai https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanai Loihi Seamount https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lo?ihi_Seamount Mahukona https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahukona Maui https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maui Mauna Kea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauna_Kea Mauna Loa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauna_Loa Mount Ka'ala https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ka?ala Punchbowl Crater https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punchbowl_Crater Mount Waialeale https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Waialeale West Maui Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Maui_Mountains Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_the_United_States Music: Where I am From,Topher Mohr and Alex Elena; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continenta



25. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Idaho, United States

  • Duration: 62
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Idaho, United States

Thanks for watching... Big Southern Butte https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Southern_Butte Blue Creek Craters of the Moon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craters_of_the_Moon_National_Monument_and_Preserve Henry's Fork Caldera https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry%27s_Fork_Caldera Island Park Caldera https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Island_Park_Caldera Juniper Buttes Menan Buttes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menan_Buttes Split Butte The Great Rift https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craters_of_the_Moon_National_Monument_and_Preserve Twin Peaks Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_the_United_States Music: The Chase,Topher Mohr and Alex Elena; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical examples of this



27. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in the United Kingdom

  • Duration: 66
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in the United Kingdom

Thanks for watching.... Name Elevation Last eruption meters feet -------------------------------------------------------- Ardnamurchan - - c.55 million years ago Arthur's Seat 251 824 Carboniferous Borrowdale Volcanics (Cumbria) Silurian or earlier Cheviot Hills 815 2674 Ordovician Cuillin Hills (on Isle of Skye) Tertiary Dundee Law extinct volcano in Dundee 500 Ordovician Edinburgh Castle castle rock - - Lower Carboniferous Giant's Causeway - - Paleogene Glen Coe Caldera - - Silurian Snowdonia mountains in North Wales Ordovician Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_the_United_Kingdom Music : Blank Holes,Jingle Punks; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical exampl


28. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Washington, United States

  • Duration: 78
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Washington, United States

Thanks for watching... Battle Ground Lake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_Ground_Lake_State_Park Black Buttes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Buttes Mount Adams https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Adams_(Washington) Mount Baker https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Baker Glacier Peak https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glacier_Peak Goat Rocks https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goat_Rocks Indian Heaven https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Heaven Lone Butte https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lone_Butte_(Washington) Marble Mountain-Trout Creek Hill volcanic zone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble_Mountain-Trout_Creek_Hill Mount Rainier https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Rainier Mount St. Helens https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_St._Helens Silver Star Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silver_Star_Mountain_(Skamania_County,_Washington) Simcoe Mountains Trout Creek Hill https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trout_Creek_Hill West Crater https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Crater White Chuck Cinder Cone Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_the_United_States Music: Tick Tock,Jimmy Fontanez; Media Right Productions; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting p


29. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in French Polynesia

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in French Polynesia

Thanks for watching.... Bora Bora https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bora_Bora MacDonald Mangareva https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mangareva Mehetia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mehetia Moorea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mo%27orea Moua Pihaa Nuku Hiva https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuku_Hiva Raiatea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raiatea Rocard Teahitia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teahitia Tohiea Orohena https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mont_Orohena Roonui Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_French_Polynesia Music: Windows Rolled Down,The 126ers; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical examples of this kind of volcano are Mount Etna and the volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


30. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Turkey

  • Duration: 72
  • Channel: news
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Turkey

Thanks for watching.... Name Elevation Last eruption ------------------------------------------------------------------- meters feet Acigöl-Nevsehir 1689 5541 Holocene Mount Ararat 5137 16,854 1840 Erciyes Dagi 3916 12,848 253 BC Girekol - - Holocene Göllü Dag 2143 7031 Holocene Hasan Dagi 3253 10,672 6200 BC Karaca Dag 1957 6421 - Karadag 2271 7450 - Karapinar Field 1302 4272 6200 BC Kars Plateau 3000 9842 Unknown Kula (volcano) 750 2461 Holocene Nemrut Dagi 2948 9672 1692 Süphan Dagi 4158 13,642 Holocene Tendürek Dagi 3584 11,758 1855 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Turkey Music : The Deed,Jingle Punks; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical examples of this kind of volcano are Mount Etna and the volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


31. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Chad

  • Duration: 57
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Chad

Thanks for watching.... Abeki Emi Koussi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emi_Koussi Oyoye Tarso Toh https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarso_Toh Toussidé https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toussidé Tarso Voon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarso_Voon Tieroko Yega Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Chad Music: Cliff Side,Silent Partner; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical examples of this kind of volcano are Mount Etna and the volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


32. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Colombia

  • Duration: 84
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Colombia

Thanks for watching.... Azufral https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azufral Cerro Bravo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Bravo Cerro Machín https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Machín Cerro Negro de Mayasquer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Negro_de_Mayasquer Chiles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiles_(volcano) Cumbal https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cumbal_Volcano Doña Juana https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doña_Juana Galeras https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galeras Nevado del Huila https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nevado_del_Huila Nevado del Tolima https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nevado_del_Tolima Nevado del Ruiz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nevado_del_Ruiz Petacas Puracé https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puracé Romeral https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romeral_(volcano) Santa Isabel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Isabel_(volcano) Sotará https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sotará_(volcano) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Colombia Music: Hands Way Up,Gunnar Olsen; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, s


33. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Yukon, Canada

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Yukon, Canada

Thanks for watching.... Alligator Lake volcanic complex https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alligator_Lake_volcanic_complex Bennett Lake Volcanic Complex https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bennett_Lake_Volcanic_Complex Felsite Peak https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felsite_Peak Mount Harper https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Harper Ibex Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ibex_Mountain Mount McNeil https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_McNeil Montana Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montana_Mountain Mount Skukum Volcanic Complex https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Skukum_Volcanic_Complex Mount Nansen (Yukon) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Nansen_(Yukon) Ne Ch'e Ddhawa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ne_Ch%27e_Ddhawa Rabbit Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabbit_Mountain Volcano Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano_Mountain Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Canada Music: Arriba Mami,Jingle Punks; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cool


34. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Guatemala

  • Duration: 111
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Guatemala

Thanks for watching.... Acatenango https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acatenango Agua https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_de_Agua Almolonga https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almolonga Atitlán https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Atitlán Chingo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chingo Cerro Santiago https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Santiago Cerro de Oro Chicabal https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicabal Chiquimula Volcanic Field https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiquimula_Volcanic_Field Coxóm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_de_Coxóm Cuilapa-Barbarena https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuilapa-Barbarena Flores https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_de_Flores Fuego https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_de_Fuego Ipala https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipala_(volcano) Ixtepeque https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtepeque Jumaytepeque https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Jumaytepeque Moyuta https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moyuta_(volcano) Pacaya https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacaya Quezaltepeque https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quezaltepeque_(volcano) San Pedro https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_San_Pedro Santa María https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_María_(volcano) Santo Tomas https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Santo_Tomás Siete Orejas https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Siete_Orejas Suchitán https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suchitan Tacaná https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Tacaná Tahual https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tahual Tajumulco https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Tajumulco Tecuamburro https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecuamburro Tolimán https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcán_Tolimán Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Guatemala Music: Another_Perspective, YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


35. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Victoria, Australia

  • Duration: 73
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Victoria, Australia

Thanks for watching.... Aberfeldy Volcano Bogong Volcano Bonang Volcano Lake Bullen Merri https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Bullen_Merri Mount Buninyong https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Buninyong Lake Colongulac Dargo Mount Eccles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Eccles Mount Elephant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Elephant Flinders Volcano Mount Franklin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Franklin_(Victoria) Gelantipy Volcano Lake Gnotuk Mount Hamilton Mount Hotham https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Hotham Howitt Volcano Lake Keilambete Mount Kooroocheang La Trobe Volcano Mount Leura https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Leura Mount Macedon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Macedon Mount Napier https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Napier Mount Noorat https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Noorat Poowong https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poowong,_Victoria Mount Porndon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Porndon Lake Purrumbete https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Purrumbete Toombullup Volcano Tower Hill (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tower_Hill_(volcano) Uplands Volcano Mount Warrenheip https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Warrenheip Mount Warrnambool https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Warrnambool Western Plains Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Australia Music: Awakening,YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental pl


36. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in British Columbia, Canada | Part #2

  • Duration: 103
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in British Columbia, Canada | Part #2

Thanks for watching.... Meehaz Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meehaz_Mountain Meszah Peak https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meszah_Peak Moraine Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moraine_Cone Mosquito Mound https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosquito_Mound Nahta Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nahta_Cone Nanook Dome https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanook_Dome Nazko Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazko_Cone Nuthinaw Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuthinaw_Mountain Mount Noel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Noel Opal Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opal_Cone Oshawa Seamount https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oshawa_Seamount Ospika pipe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ospika_pipe Outcast Hill https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outcast_Hill Mount Overill https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Overill Pali Dome https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pali_Dome Peirce Seamount https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peirce_Seamount Perkin's Pillar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perkin%27s_Pillar Pharaoh Dome https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pharaoh_Dome Pillow Creek https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pillow_Creek Pillow Ridge https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pillow_Ridge Plinth Peak https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plinth_Peak Pointed Stick Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pointed_Stick_Cone Powder Mountain (British Columbia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powder_Mountain_(British_Columbia) Mount Price (British Columbia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Price_(British_Columbia) Pylon Peak (British Columbia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pylon_Peak_(British_Columbia) The Pyramid (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pyramid_(volcano) Pyramid Mountain (Wells Gray-Clearwater) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramid_Mountain_(Wells_Gray-Clearwater) Pyroclastic Peak https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyroclastic_Peak Rainbow Range (Chilcotin Plateau) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainbow_Range_(Chilcotin_Plateau) Mount Ray (British Columbia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Ray_(British_Columbia) Ridge Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ridge_Cone Ring Mountain (British Columbia) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_Mountain_(British_Columbia) Round Mountain (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Round_Mountain_(volcano) Ruby Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_Mountain Satah Mountain https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satah_Mountain The Saucer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Saucer Seminole Seamount https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seminole_Seamount Sezill Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sezill_Volcano Sham Hill https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sham_Hill Sidas Cone https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidas_Cone Continue..... Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Canada Music: Bounce House,Silent Partner; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


37. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Chile - #Part 2

  • Duration: 118
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Chile - #Part 2

Thanks for watching.... Alitar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alitar Acamarachi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acamarachi Colachi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colachi Laguna Verde (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Verde_(volcano) Cerro Overo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Overo Aguas Calientes (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aguas_Calientes_(volcano) Lascar (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lascar_(volcano) Chiliques https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiliques Cordón de Puntas Negras https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordón_de_Puntas_Negras Miñiques https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miñiques Caichinque https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caichinque Pular (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pular_(volcano) El Negrillar https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Negrillar Socompa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socompa Llullaillaco https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llullaillaco Cerro Escorial https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Escorial Lastarria https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lastarria Cordón del Azufre https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordón_del_Azufre Cerro Bayo Complex https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Bayo_Complex Dos Crateres https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dos_Crateres Sierra de Gorbea https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_de_Gorbea Dos Puntas https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dos_Puntas Sierra Nevada de Lagunas Bravas https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sierra_Nevada_de_Lagunas_Bravas Falso Azufre https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falso_Azufre Pukao (seamount) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pukao_(seamount) Incahuasi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incahuasi Cerro Solo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Solo Poike https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poike Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Chile Music: Animal,Max Surla; Media Right Productions; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creati


38. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in El Salvador

  • Duration: 95
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in El Salvador

Thanks for watching.... Apaneca Range https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cordillera_de_Apaneca Apastepeque Volcanic Field https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apastepeque_Volcanic_Field Chingo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chingo Cerro Cinotepeque Cerro Singüil Chinameca https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinameca_(volcano) Coatepeque Caldera https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coatepeque_Caldera Conchagua https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conchagua_(volcano) Conchaguita https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conchagüita El Tigre Guazapa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guazapa_(volcano) Ilopango https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Ilopango Izalco https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izalco_(volcano) Laguna Aramuaca San Diego San Miguel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Miguel_(volcano) San Salvador https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Salvador_(volcano) San Vicente https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Vicente_(volcano) Santa Ana https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana_Volcano Taburete https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taburete Tecapa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecapa Usulután https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usulután_(volcano) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_El_Salvador Music: Can't Change His Mind,Silent Partner; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offsho


39. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Eritrea

  • Duration: 56
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Eritrea

Thanks for watching.... Alid Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alid_Volcano Asseb Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asseb_Volcano Dubbi Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubbi_Volcano Gufa Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gufa_Volcano Nabro Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nabro_Volcano Mousa Ali https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mousa_Ali Jalua Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jalua_Volcano Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Eritrea Music: First Day,Huma-Huma; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle wedge, creating magma. This magma tends to be very viscous due to its high silica content, so often does not reach the surface and cools at depth. When it does reach the surface, a volcano is formed. Typical examples of this kind of volcano are Mount Etna and the volcanoes in the Pacific Ring of Fire. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volcano


40. Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Chile - #Part 5

  • Duration: 68
  • Channel: travel
Earth's Extremes - Volcanoes in Chile - #Part 5

Thanks for watching.... Chaitén (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaitén_(volcano) Corcovado Volcano https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corcovado_Volcano Yanteles https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanteles Melimoyu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melimoyu Puyuhuapi (volcanic group) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puyuhuapi_(volcanic_group) Mentolat https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentolat Cay (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cay_(volcano) Cerro Macá https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Macá Mount Hudson https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Hudson Cerro Arenales https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Arenales Lautaro (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lautaro_(volcano) Viedma (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viedma_(volcano) Aguilera (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aguilera_(volcano) Reclus (volcano) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reclus_(volcano) Pali-Aike Volcanic Field https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pali-Aike_Volcanic_Field Monte Burney https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monte_Burney Fueguino https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fueguino Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_volcanoes_in_Chile Music: Cameras,ALBIS; YouTube Audio Library A volcano is a rupture on the crust of a planetary mass object, such as the Earth, which allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because the planet's crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in the Earth's mantle. Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates pulling apart; the Pacific Ring of Fire has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates coming together. Volcanoes can also form where there is stretching and thinning of the crust's interior plates, e.g., in the East African Rift and the Wells Gray-Clearwater volcanic field and Rio Grande Rift in North America. This type of volcanism falls under the umbrella of "plate hypothesis" volcanism. Volcanism away from plate boundaries has also been explained as mantle plumes. These so-called "hotspots", for example Hawaii, are postulated to arise from upwelling diapirs with magma from the core–mantle boundary, 3,000 km deep in the Earth. Volcanoes are usually not created where two tectonic plates slide past one another. Erupting volcanoes can pose many hazards, not only in the immediate vicinity of the eruption. One such hazard is that volcanic ash can be a threat to aircraft, in particular those with jet engines where ash particles can be melted by the high operating temperature; the melted particles then adhere to the turbine blades and alter their shape, disrupting the operation of the turbine. Large eruptions can affect temperature as ash and droplets of sulfuric acid obscure the sun and cool the Earth's lower atmosphere (or troposphere); however, they also absorb heat radiated up from the Earth, thereby warming the upper atmosphere (or stratosphere). Historically, so-called volcanic winters have caused catastrophic famines. At the mid-oceanic ridges, two tectonic plates diverge from one another as new oceanic crust is formed by the cooling and solidifying of hot molten rock. Because the crust is very thin at these ridges due to the pull of the tectonic plates, the release of pressure leads to adiabatic expansion and the partial melting of the mantle, causing volcanism and creating new oceanic crust. Most divergent plate boundaries are at the bottom of the oceans; therefore, most volcanic activity is submarine, forming new seafloor. Black smokers (also known as deep sea vents) are an example of this kind of volcanic activity. Where the mid-oceanic ridge is above sea-level, volcanic islands are formed, for example, Iceland. Subduction zones are places where two plates, usually an oceanic plate and a continental plate, collide. In this case, the oceanic plate subducts, or submerges under the continental plate forming a deep ocean trench just offshore. In a process called flux melting, water released from the subdu